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Stefan Schaltegger and Roger Burritt

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Stefan Schaltegger and Roger Burritt

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Markus Beckmann, Stefan Schaltegger and Nancy E. Landrum

Taking the viewpoint of responsible management, this chapter develops a conceptual perspective on sustainability management and discusses its research implications. It shows that sustainability management (a) addresses a specific form of responsibility (to manage the long-term creation of value and the reduction of disvalue in the ecological, social, and economic dimension in an integrative manner),( b) responds to the expectations and needs of specific others (natural and social environments on the micro-, meso-, and macro-level), (c) refers to specific responsibility objects (life-cycle, value chain, and consumption-related effects), (d) uses specific tools and (e) unfolds as the interplay of specific responsibility roles (explicit and implicit sustainability managers as well as sustainable managers) that can display agency for sustainability. Topics for further research are discussed and scholars are invited to explore the relationship between sustainable and responsible management.

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Florian Lüdeke-Freund, Tobias Froese and Stefan Schaltegger

Chapter 6, ‘The role of business models for sustainable consumption: A pattern approach’ by Florian Lüdeke-Freund, Tobias Froese and Stefan Schaltegger explores the role of business models in shifting towards more sustainable consumption patterns and levels. The main ideas discussed in this chapter relate to the role of business models in supporting strong sustainable consumption (SSC), different sustainability strategies and how sustainable business model patterns can become a means to design better production-consumption systems. These ideas can serve as a starting point for more comprehensive and balanced debates about how companies, that is, the major designers of modern production-consumption systems, can contribute to strong sustainable consumption. The authors ask readers to go beyond the often heard calls for efficiency and sufficiency business models, which too often ignore that neither sustainability strategies nor business models unfold in a vacuum. Hence, it is important to consider multiple sustainability strategies and multiple business model design options simultaneously. The authors, therefore, call for approaches that consider both multiple sustainability strategies and multiple business model patterns in order to create better production-consumption systems that could help humanity to navigate through the increasingly narrowing ‘strong sustainable consumption corridor’.

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Philip Beske-Janssen, Stefan Schaltegger and Sonja Liedke

This chapter deals with the link between research and practice in the field of performance measurement for sustainable supply chain management. The development and current state of methods to measure and manage sustainability performance are examined by means of a literature review and discussed in light of the Higg Index, a tool developed in the corporate practice of the textiles industry which is analysed based on 18 in-depth interviews with experts on the Higg Index. The data areused to examine how far a method developed and used in corporate practice corresponds with approaches proposed in the research literature. The example of the Higg Index indicates that corporate practice may be more advanced in some areas than researchers generally assume. At the same time, it seems to be following conventional business practices and avoids relevant actions to meaningfully enhance sustainable development.