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Edited by Stephen P. Osborne and Louise Brown

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Stephen P. Osborne and Louise Brown

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Stephen P. Osborne and Louise Brown

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Louise Brown and Stephen P. Osborne

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Edited by Stephen P. Osborne and Louise Brown

Leading researchers from across the globe review the state of the art in research on innovation in public services, providing an overview of key issues from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Topics explored include: context for innovation in public services and public service reform; managerial change challenges; ICT and e-government; and collaboration and networks. The theory is underpinned by seven wide-ranging case studies of innovation in practice.
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Stephen Brown

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Stephen Brown

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Stephen Brown

In a recent study, Jill Avery and colleagues made the case for ‘Brand Biography’, arguing that it represents a new departure for our understanding of branding. This chapter considers that claim in relation to place branding. It finds that Place Brand Biographies predate Avery et al.’s breakthrough and, drawing upon Mark Cousins’ cinematic biography of Belfast, ponders the essentially ontological assumption that places are ‘living things’.

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Hannah L. Brown, Chase R. Booth, Elizabeth G. Eason and Assistant Professor Damian G. Kelty-Stephen

This gender study exemplifies fields struggling to balance the deeply ingrained desire for logical formalisms and conceptually dynamic models of systems. Gender Studies grounds itself in dynamic models as seen in the popularity of ‘intersectionality theory,’ a notion of experiences as unfolding at the ‘intersections’ of classical taxonomies. This popular theory evades quantitative research because it eschews classical categorical distinctions. The authors introduce multifractal analysis and suggest that cascade dynamics and multifractal analysis provide logical and corresponding statistical frameworks to make intersectionality quantitatively and tractably expressible for gendered experiences. Recent cognitive science advances involve multifractal analysis laying bare key features of the cascades driving cognitive performance. The chapter offers similar demonstration of similar cascades in gender dynamics through multifractal analysis of web-traffic data for gender terms on Wikipedia. It concludes that cascade formalisms and multifractal analysis offer new avenues for gender studies balancing both logical formalisms and dynamic concepts.