You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items

  • Author or Editor: Stephen Kinsella x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Saed Khalil and Stephen Kinsella

We investigate the propagation of contagion through banks’ balance sheets in a two-country model. We simulate an increase in non-performing loans in one bank, and study the effects on other banks and the macro-economy of each country. We show that credit crunches destabilize each economy in the short run and in the long run reduce potential output. We quantify this loss.

You do not have access to this content

K. Vela Velupillai, Stefano Zambelli and Stephen Kinsella

Computable economics is a growing field of research which has been given much attention by scholars in recent decades. In this authoritative research review, the editors successfully bring together the seminal papers of computable economics from the last sixty years and encompass the works of some of the most influential researchers in this area. Topics covered include the foundations of computable economics, classics of computable choice theory, computable macroeconomics and computable and social choice theory. This research review will serve as an essential source of reference for students and researchers in the field.
This content is available to you

K. Vela Velupillai, Stefano Zambelli and Stephen Kinsella

You do not have access to this content

K. Vela Velupillai, Stefano Zambelli and Stephen Kinsella

This content is available to you

Markus P.A. Schneider, Stephen Kinsella and Antoine Godin

We present two Gini-like inequality indices that provide a more nuanced picture of how the profile of inequality has changed across European countries since 2005. We use these indices to analyse the distributional changes that can be attributed to the push for austerity. We estimate the JV-indices for 24 European countries over 9 years, and then use this panel to analyse the distributional effects of the fiscal consolidation policies Europe endured after the 2008 crisis. We find that austerity increased income inequality in eurozone countries, but reduced income inequality in countries that do not use the euro as their currency. We uncover a significant new relationship between austerity policies and the tails of the income distribution, further suggesting that in the eurozone these policies on average amount to a redistribution from the bottom to the top.