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Stephen Procter

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Stephen Procter

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Stephen Procter

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Stephen Procter

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Stephen Procter

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Stewart Johnstone and Stephen Procter

AutoParts designs and manufactures automotive components for heavy duty commercial vehicles, including trucks, buses and agricultural equipment. Production began at the site in the 1990s, and has grown significantly since its inception, in terms of both employment numbers and production output. Manufacturing activity is focused around two main business streams. First, the assembly of automotive components supplied to vehicle manufacturers for installation in new vehicles, and secondly the production of aftermarket components which must be replaced by users at regular intervals through the life of vehicles. While demand for new parts closely reflects volatile automotive markets, demand for replacement components is generally more stable and predictable.

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Stephen Procter and Jos Benders

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Jonas A. Ingvaldsen, Jos Benders and Stephen Procter

In this chapter the authors look at how the idea of voice can be applied to the actual work that employees do. Current trends in the restructuring of work - particularly the development of team-based systems - are, on the face of it, consistent with, and to some degree actually based on, the enhancement of employee voice. A full picture of the work-voice relationship, however, requires that we take a number of qualifying considerations into account. Four basic issues are therefore examined: how issues of autonomy play out in work systems based on lean principles; the implications for management of giving employees a greater say in how their work is conducted; the relationship between employee voice at an individual and at a team level; and the relationship between task-based voice and organizational performance. In the light of their consideration of these issues, the authors identify the areas in which organizational practice and academic research might most usefully be focused.

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Charles Booth, Peter Clark, Agnès Delahaye-Dado, Michael Rowlinson and Stephen Procter