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Anjana Anandakumar, Tyrone S. Pitsis and Stewart R. Clegg

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Miguel Pina e Cunha, João Vieira Da Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

Explains the purpose of the book, as a general introduction to organizational paradox theory. It presents a map of the book

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

Introduces key definitions and ideas developed by organizational paradox scholars, which constitute the currently agreed upon conceptual core of paradox theory. A brief history of the evolution of the concept and of the vital scholarly community that has been studying paradox is provided. The chapter also includes concrete examples of organizational paradoxes, presents the debate on the ontology of paradoxes and reflects on the potential of a paradox lens in organization studies.

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

This chapter maps different ways to cope with paradoxical tensions described in literature, emphasising how this copying is dynamic and based on practices. In contrast with the accepted model though, it is argued that there are not intrinsically good or bad ways to deal with paradox, but that every modality has its own pros and cons.

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

Considering paradox from a Positive Organizational Scholarship perspective, the chapter highlights how paradoxical tensions can be harnessed to manifest virtuous organizational cultures of abundance and generate learning opportunities. The chapter further considers the need for navigating contradictions implicit to positive organizational practices

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Marco Berti, Ace Simpson, Miguel P. Cunha and Stewart R. Clegg

This chapter explores the notion of the absurd. It is shown that absurdity produces both paralysing effects (the ‘dark side’ of paradoxes) and generative ones (challenging the status quo). This perspective allows to investigate the impact of paradoxes on individuals, considering how they can be made more resilient to contradictions (through the development of paradox mindsets) but also stressing the need for their empowerment, to enable them to navigate or defuse paradoxes