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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

Technology plays a significant role in doctoral leadership studies providing a channel for teaching, learning, research, and administrative processes. Existing and new programs seek to leverage technology-mediated learning in order to provide access, convenience, enriched learning, and develop new pathways to achieve a doctorate. Advancing Doctoral Leadership Education Through Technology offers ideas, experiences, and practices relevant to doctoral faculty, chairs and directors, administrators, researchers, and doctoral students interested in learning and research in technology and leadership education.
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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

This content is available to you

Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

This content is available to you

Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

Technology plays a significant role in doctoral leadership education providing a channel for teaching, learning, research and administrative practices. In this context, technology applied in doctoral leadership studies requires further exploration and serves to benefit students and society through innovative programs and learning designs. This chapter familiarizes the reader with the content and structure of the book. This is followed by an introduction to each of the chapters and their respective authors. The recent shifts in doctoral education and technology invite a conversation about pedagogical philosophies, processes and policies to consider learning environments and practices that will facilitate the future of postgraduate leadership education.

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Stuart D. Allen, Stephen K. Layson and Albert N. Link

This article presents a systematic analysis of the net economic benefits associated with the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. We offer a derivation of producer and consumer surplus to estimate economic benefits. Fundamental to the implementation of these models is a specific value of the elasticity of demand, but in its absence we estimate what its value would be when the benefit-to-cost ratio associated with public support of the SBIR program equals unity. We infer from these calculations, and from general knowledge about the ability of SBIR-funded firms to exploit their monopoly position, that the SBIR program likely generates positive net economic benefits to society.