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Susan Bibler Coutin

The number of unaccompanied children entering the United States from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras rose from 3,000 to 4,500 in the early 2000s to close to 60,000 in 2016. Who are these children? Why are they migrating? What are their future prospects? To address these questions, this chapter explores the complex history of Salvadoran migration, with a focus on the perspectives and experiences of children and youth. Key features of this history include civil war, U.S. economic and military intervention, and the denial of refuge. Current child migration is rooted in these earlier moments.

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Susan Bibler Coutin

New Legal Realist approaches often examine law-in-practice, as experienced by the agents who carry out the law, the individuals who are law’s targets, and the communities that law brings into being. Ethnography, a flexible research process that positions researchers within these communities, is a particularly appropriate a new legal realist research method. Using the example of ethnographic research regarding U.S. immigration law and policy, the author explores how crossing boundaries between law and social sciences, research and praxis, and individual and collaborative research produces new legal realist approaches. Law and social sciences can be bridged by emphasizing their affinities, such as interviewing, note-taking, crafting papers or statements, deploying evidence to substantiate arguments, citing relevant studies and legal opinions, and gaining insight into social contexts. Boundaries between research and praxis can be crossed through engaged research and through fieldwork that places researchers in the role of practitioners, thus facilitating the translation of research findings into policy arenas. Assembling interdisciplinary research teams crosses boundaries between individual and collaborative work and furthers new legal realist approaches by making “translation” intrinsic to the research process itself.