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Susan Rose-Ackerman

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Edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman

Economic research on corruption aims both to isolate the economic effects of quid pro quo deals between agents and third parties, and to suggest how legal and institutional reforms might curb harms and enhance benefits. In this comprehensive Handbook, top scholars in the field provide specially commissioned essays, both theoretical and empirical, exploring both types of research.
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Susan Rose-Ackerman

Administrative government complicates the question of democratic legitimacy by moving policymaking outside both the electoral process and the legislative chamber. Given the practical requirement of delegating policymaking and implementation to the executive in a modern regulatory-welfare state, how can democratic values be preserved when decisions require expertise and officials must make decisions quickly in a rapidly changing environment? This chapter concentrates on the connections between expertise and public participation in the production of public policy. It unpacks the concept of public participation and the way it can affect policymaking and implementation choices, for good or for ill. It then concentrates on a specific case, the German Energiewende that aims to increase the generation of electric power from renewables at the same time as it phases out nuclear power. The German case demonstrates that public involvement is not per se desirable but must be organized to complement expertise and enhance democratic accountability. The chapter links to Rose-Ackerman’s broader research agenda in comparative administrative law.

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Edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman and Tina Søreide

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Edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman and Tina Søreide

A companion volume to the International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption published in 2006, the specially commissioned papers in Volume Two present some of the best policy-oriented research in the field. They stress the institutional roots of corruption and include new research on topics ranging from corruption in regulation and procurement to vote buying and private firm payoffs.
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Tina Søreide and Susan Rose-Ackerman

Fighting corruption requires careful analyses of its underlying causes and consequences. This chapter provides an economic analysis of corruption as a trade in decisions that should not be for sale. The size of the bribe and the consequences of corruption are functions of the bargaining powers of those involved. We suggest ways to re-organize decision-making procedures to reduce the risks of corruption but stress the difficulty of breaking up entrenched collusive environments. Furthermore, even if corruption in a public institution is well recognized, it may not be possible to identify individual offenders. The question then is whether one should sanction the entire public body. Like private entities, public institutions can be encouraged to self-police and self-report (for example upon information from a whistleblower) if such steps will reduce the extent of some penalty. However, the criminal and administrative monetary sanctions applied to private sector entities are a poor fit for state institutions with on-going responsibilities to the citizenry. We propose non-monetary penalties, including intensified external monitoring, reorganization of authority, disqualification of leaders, and the removal of service provision responsibilities.

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Greed, Corruption, and the Modern State

Essays in Political Economy

Edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman and Paul Lagunes

What makes the control of corruption so difficult and contested? Drawing on the insights of political science, economics and law, the expert contributors to this book offer diverse perspectives. One group of chapters explores the nature of corruption in democracies and autocracies, and “reforms” that are mere facades. Other contributions examine corruption in infrastructure, tax collection, cross-border trade, and military procurement. Case studies from various regions – such as China, Peru, South Africa and New York City – anchor the analysis with real-world situations. The book pays particular attention to corruption involving international business and the domestic regulation of foreign bribery.
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Edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman and Paul Lagunes