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Edited by Alain Fayolle, Paula Kyrö, Tonis Mets and Urve Venesaar

This important book identifies the current developments within entrepreneurship that are characterized by conceptual richness and methodological diversity. It presents the latest developments of topics such as the entrepreneurial mindset, culture and values as well as advances in entrepreneurship education and development. The contributors open the field for methodological renewal by introducing the current state of and opportunities for explorative research in entrepreneurship.
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Edited by Alain Fayolle, Paula Kyrö, Tonis Mets and Urve Venesaar

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Tõnis Mets

The importance of innovative globalising high-tech small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the economy has grown particularly for small emerging countries because of the need for the balanced development of their innovation system, knowledge-based economy and society. Technology start-ups able to globalise from inception in the literature are called ‘born global’ (BG) companies. The chapter aims to study the internationalisation trajectories of BGs in the developing entrepreneurial ecosystem framework of the emerging knowledge economy. The author supposes that value system and networks of BGs are part of the general entrepreneurial ecosystem, and the factors leading to early internationalization are new market conditions, technological advantages and entrepreneurial learning. The three case study companies come from different fields: mobile payment _ Mobi Solutions; remote premises surveillance technology – Defendec; and smart pot and garden systems _ Click & Grow. The case studies demonstrate the different globalisation trajectories of start-ups depending on the maturity of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. The conclusion proposes that shortening the start-up period, increasing the number of success stories, and increasing the intensity of start-up creation indicate the maturity of the entrepreneurial ecosystem; and that the ecosystem itself has become more global than ever before.
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Tõnis Mets

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Inna Kozlinska, Tõnis Mets and Kärt Rõigas

The empirical study presented in this chapter addresses a major gap in entrepreneurship education (EE) research: the lack of empirical evidence that the experiential approach to teaching is associated with superior outcomes in comparison to the traditional approach. It focuses on perceived learning outcomes specifically and applies the tripartite competence framework to assess them. The analysis is based on eight semi-structured interviews with entrepreneurship educators and a survey of 306 imminent and recent bachelor’s graduates taught by the interviewed educators at four Latvian business schools. The study has somewhat unexpected results, revealing that more experiential EE does not necessarily lead to better outcomes, and in some cases is even associated with an adverse effect, and that other factors unrelated to the interventions-in-question directly exhibit significant influence on these outcomes.