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Edited by Thierry Delpeuch and Jacqueline E. Ross

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Thierry Delpeuch and Jacqueline E. Ross

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Thierry Delpeuch and Jacqueline E. Ross

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Comparing the Democratic Governance of Police Intelligence

New Models of Participation and Expertise in the United States and Europe

Edited by Thierry Delpeuch and Jacqueline E. Ross

"Intelligence-led policing" is an emerging movement of efforts to develop a more democratic approach to the governance of intelligence by expanding the types of expertise and the range of participants who collaborate in the networked governance of intelligence. This book examines how the partnership paradigm has transformed the ways in which participants gather, analyze, and use intelligence about security problems ranging from petty nuisances and violent crime to urban riots, organized crime, and terrorism. It explores changes in the way police and other security professionals define and prioritize these concerns and how the expanding range of stakeholders and the growing repertoire of solutions has transformed both the expertise and the deliberative processes involved.
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Thierry Delpeuch and Margarita Vassileva

This chapter examines the transfer efforts made by American donors and operators in the policy field of judicial reforms. On the basis of a qualitative empirical study of a Bulgarian case (1989–2014), we highlight the political dimensions of policy transfer. These political aspect associated with the importing and exporting of institutional models highlights two crucial characteristics of international technical assistance. Firstly, in this case it is evident that the process aims to change the status and the role of the judicial system within Bulgarian society, and second, to achieve this the process of transfer involves directly interfering in the host countries’ processes of policy making as well as reform implementation. We show that American transfer agents demonstrate a significant capacity to influence Bulgarian judicial reforms, which rests on a number of key elements: the deployment of a decentralized, grassroots-oriented and bottom-up approach of judicial assistance; the ability to bring together technical and political prescriptions; the aptitude to produce detailed, accurate and usable expertise; and, finally, the capacity to create from scratch local agents of transfer and to build coalitions of political support around them. Keywords: Bulgaria, Europeanization, judicial system, judicial reform, development assistance, US foreign policy

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Thierry Delpeuch, Renaud Epstein and Jacqueline E. Ross