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Edited by Thomas Eger, Michael Faure and Zhang Naigen

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Edited by Thomas Eger, Michael Faure and Zhang Naigen

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Thomas Eger, Michael Faure and Zhang Naigen

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Edited by Thomas Eger, Michael Faure and Zhang Naigen

This book comprises contributions on recent developments in China from a law and economics perspective. For the first time Chinese and European scholars jointly discuss some important attributes of China’s legal and economic system, and some recent problems, from this particular viewpoint.
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Thomas Eger and Margot Schüller

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Thomas Eger and Hans-Bernd Schäfer

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Edited by Thomas Eger and Hans-Bernd Schäfer

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Edited by Thomas Eger and Hans-Bernd Schäfer

The Handbook focuses particularly on how the development of EU law negotiates the tension between market integration, national sovereignty and political democracy. The book begins with chapters examining constitutional issues, while further chapters address the establishment of a single market. The volume also addresses sovereign debt problems by providing a detailed analysis of the architecture of the EU’s monetary institutions, its monetary policy and their implications.
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The Economics of Open Access

On the Future of Academic Publishing

Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen

Addressing the recent debate on how the future of academic publishing might look in a purely digital environment, this book analyzes the experiences of researchers with, as well as attitudes towards, ‘Open Access’ (OA) publishing. Drawing on a unique, in-depth survey with more than 10,000 respondents from 25 countries, Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen discuss their findings in the light of recent policy attempts which have been trying to foster OA, revealing considerable shortcomings and lack of knowledge on fundamental features of the academic publishing market.