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Timothy Clark

This chapter focuses on exploring a range of issues concerned with submitting to special issues. A number of contributors to this volume have alluded to special issues being associated with a number of dark practices. It is often not clear how a special issue was commissioned, how the editors were chosen, how papers were reviewed, and so on. Many people comment on the closed and opaque nature of special issues. As an author, I have experienced some of these frustrations. Similarly, many colleagues have voiced their annoyance and anger following their perceived mistreatment by special issue editors. While grumbles about rejection from journals are not uncommon, indeed, they are the stuff of everyday corridor conversations, they seem more intense in relation to special issues. I have witnessed colleagues hunt down special issue editors at conferences to vent their ire. Anyone who has edited a journal will know that occasionally hiding you name badge gives you a moment of peace at a conference. On one occasion a very frustrated collaborator dragged me to the publishers’ exhibition at a leading international conference. They thrust the latest edition of a journal into my hands and asked if I was aware of this special issue. I was not. It focused on an area of research in which we had a joint interest. To us and others we spoke to it seemed to have emerged via some secretive process.

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Timothy Clark

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Stephanos Avakian and Timothy Clark

This research review brings together some of the most influential papers that have contributed to our understanding of management consultancy work. It encompasses the breadth of conceptual and empirical perspectives and explores those key ideas that have helped to advance our knowledge of this intriguing area.
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Stephanos Avakian and Timothy Clark

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Stephanos Avakian and Timothy Clark

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Stephanos Avakian and Timothy Clark

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Timothy Clark, Pojanath Bhatanacharoen and David Greatbatch

In this chapter we examine how management gurus through the telling of epiphanic and non-epiphanic stories convey the level of adaptability of their ideas. We argue that for their ideas to leave the auditorium with the audience members they have to present them in ways which convincingly demonstrate that they are potentially pertinent to the variety of working lives of those who attend. Drawing on a Conversation Analytic approach, the chapter shows that in the post-story assessment the gurus use a double structure of humor then seriousness. The contrast between the light-heartedness of the story and the seriousness of the post-story conclusion provides emphasis to the message being delivered as well as the transition from the specifics of the story to the general applicability of the ideas being conveyed. Overall, the chapter argues that these stories provide attention and emphasis to central messages within these talks and thereby supply the underpinning conditions necessary for gurus’ ideas to flow beyond the venue of their talks.
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Edited by Mike Wright, David J. Ketchen, Jr. and Timothy Clark

This expanded second edition of a classic career guide offers fascinating insight into the publishing environment for the management discipline, drawing on a wealth of knowledge and experiences from leading scholars and top-level journal editors. Responding to the continuing emphasis on publishing in the top journals, this revised, updated and extended guide offers invaluable tips and advice for anyone looking to publish their work in these publications.
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Edited by Mike Wright, David J. Ketchen, Jr. and Timothy Clark

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Mike Wright, David J. Ketchen Jr. and Timothy Clark

Scholars find the journal publishing process exhilarating, baffling and frustrating in equal measure. The professional joy and excitement of receiving an acceptance letter following a long drawn-out process in which you have diligently responded to successive rounds of reviewers’ comments is probably only matched by a letter awarding a research grant. Contrast this to the sense of dejection and distress that accompanies a rejection letter. This is further exacerbated if the reviewers’ comments and decision appear to be harsh and if they make little sense. It is even more disappointing if the paper appears to have been progressing through different rounds of reviewing only to be rejected late in the process. Therefore, we have to start all over again. We may not realize it but academics are not dissimilar to actors in that they constantly have to audition their work in journals or to research funders. Learning to live with rejection is a key part of the role. We cannot be successful with every submission.