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Tony Dundon

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Tony Dundon

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Tony Dundon

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Tony Dundon

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Tony Dundon

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Tony Dobbins and Tony Dundon

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Tony Dobbins and Tony Dundon

Employer-sponsored non-union employee representation (NER) forums have attracted interest from human resources management practitioners, policy-makers and scholars, particularly in Anglo-Saxon liberal market contexts. NER bodies may take a wide variety of forms, constituting a potential alternative voice channel to trade unionism. Yet NER bodies remain relatively rare, perpetuating a significant representation and voice gap for most workers across the Anglo-Saxon world. Employers may have multiple reasons for introducing NER bodies: sometimes, but not always, to avoid unions. This depends on the contextual circumstances of different employers. NER bodies tend to lack independence and genuine power-sharing for mutual gains because they are management controlled. This is unlikely to change in the current political economy context, which provides limited scope for employee participation in workplace governance. Fresh thinking about alternative models of industrial democracy is required.

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Christine Cross and Tony Dundon

Social exchange theory (SET) has long been used as a way to try and unpick and examine various social and psychological relationships that exist in a workplace, typically involving workers and co-workers, employers and supervisors, line managers, trade unions, customers and other stakeholders with an interest in the firm and its human resource management practices. In this chapter the authors review the nature and components associated with the social aspects of work and employment relations. The chapter outlines some of key debates associated with SET and explains the main theoretical properties. From this, several employment issues and HR practices are used to illustrate the application utility of SET, including the psychological contract, followed by a consideration of some of the limitations with the theory.

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Tony Dundon and Adrian Wilkinson

Many textbooks on HRM and Industrial Relations combine discursive, prescriptive, theoretical and sometimes a critical synthesis of the practical applications of abstract concepts and ideas. As a field of study, HRM covers a wide remit associated with work, employment and organizational studies. Academic disciplines overlap between sociology, economics, law, history or industrial and organisational psychology (among others) (Boxall and Purcell, 2016; Wilkinson et al., 2017, 2019; Bratton and Gold, 2019). Most approaches have the admirable aim of synthesising information and concepts to impart a degree of knowledge. Some even seek to contrast alternative or differing interpretations of such knowledge with demonstration through models, frameworks, contemporary innovations that relate to evolving contexts and scenarios for application.

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Brian Harney and Tony Dundon

Amazon is one of the world’s most recognised organisations. It was the first to leverage on-line platforms for selling and distribution, making its first book sale on-line in 1995 before diversifying into CD, DVDs and electronics and ultimately becoming the ‘everything store’. As Google is to internet search, Amazon is to e-commerce, practically inventing this category of shopping. Amazon’s overriding goal is ‘to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, where customers can find and discover anything online’.