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Trine Bille

The research field of cultural economics has increased in scale and scope over the last 50 years. At most universities, research and teaching are closely connected as teaching is research based, and therefore it is worthwhile to take a closer look at both. In this chapter, the author gives her personal view on and experience with teaching and research in cultural economics and argues for an increasing interest in and acknowledgement of the field, both among students and in society at large. Furthermore, the author gives an example of how a concrete course in ‘Cultural Economics and Policy’ at Copenhagen Business School has been developed.

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Trine Bille

In most countries, parts of the cultural sector is subsidized by public means to a greater or lesser extent, especially museums, libraries and the performing arts. This chapter discusses different arguments from economic theory for public support of arts and culture. The chapter is based on welfare economics, where the main arguments for public intervention are ‘market failure’ like public goods and externalities. The chapter shows how these concepts can be applied to the cultural sector and discusses the issues of efficiency and equity.

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Trine Bille

Economic impact studies are frequently used to show the economic impact of a cultural institution or an event in terms of increased employment and turnover. Both the arts sector and politicians have used these studies to argue for public support. The chapter describes the method and its limitations. The underlying theory in the form of input–output models and multiplier effects are explained, as well as the method’s limitations when it comes to serving as an argument for public support. The method is discussed in detail based on a case study, namely an economic impact study of ‘Aarhus, Denmark, the European Capital of Culture, 2017’.

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Trine Bille

Artists’ earnings and labour market behaviour have been studied for a long time in cultural economics. The research has mainly been concentrated around artists’ income conditions, how artists behave on the labour market and structural conditions in this particular labour market. The important questions are: Is the artists’ labour market different from other labour markets? How is it different? Why is it different? The chapter focuses on important topics such as: the definition of artists, the low average income and skewed income distribution, the work-preference model, the superstar model, the role of education and the excess supply of artists.

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A Contingent Valuation Study of the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen

Applying Environmental Valuation Techniques to Historic Buildings, Monuments and Artifacts

Trine Bille

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Trine Bille

Artists’ earnings and labour market behaviour have been studies for a long time in cultural economics. The research has mainly been concentrated around artists’ income conditions, how artists behave on the labour market and structural conditions in this particular labour market. The important questions are, is the artists’ labour market different from other labour market? How is it different? Why is it different? The chapter focuses on important topics, such as: the definition of artists, the low average income and skewed income distribution, the work-preference model, the superstar model, the role of education and the excess supply of artists. Finally, policy measures concerning artists’ labour markets are discussed.

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Trine Bille, Anna Mignosa and Ruth Towse

The introductory chapter sketches the scope of cultural economics and the structure of the book, which is specifically addressed to teachers. The book begins with five chapters by the editors and other experienced teachers of cultural economics, who describe their own teaching experiences. Then follow 37 studies organized within the six parts of the book, each of which is curated by one of the three editors: Part I: Economics of Public Support for Arts and Cultural Organizations; Part II: Financing Cultural Production; Part III: Artists’ Labour Markets; Part IV: Consumer Behaviour in the Cultural Sector; Part V: Digitization and Copyright; and Part VI: Topics in the Economics of Cultural and Creative Industries. Each chapter has suggestions for further reading, classroom exercises and test or examination questions. Case studies vary in terms of the level of prior knowledge of economics and there is something for everyone. The book may be used as the basis of a course or dipped into using just a few chapters.

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Edited by Trine Bille, Anna Mignosa and Ruth Towse

Teaching Cultural Economics is the first book of its kind to offer inspiration and guidance for teaching cultural economics through short chapters, a wide scope of knowledge and teaching cases by experienced teachers who are expert in the topic.