You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items

  • Author or Editor: Uwe Cantner x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Eko Agus Prasetio

A technology is disruptive if it provides value different from current, mainstream technologies and it initially exhibits relatively lower levels of performance that are most important to mainstream technology customers. The term has evolved since its introduction in 1997 and so has the empirical research, from how to measure the phenomenon to its relationship to market structure. In addition to startups and incumbents, Cantner and Prasetio recommend that scholars focus on ways to find emerging technology markets and their related unmet needs. Further, what is the influence of network externalities, increasing returns to technology adoption and, importantly, how does this relate to lock-in and barrier effects for new technologies to enter the market?
You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Holger Graf

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Horst Hanusch

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Jens J. Krüger

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Horst Hanusch

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Simone Vannuccini

The concept of lock-in can certainly be listed among those weighing most heavily in the conceptual toolbox used by scholars of innovation and evolutionary economics. Processes of competitive diffusion, or choice between alternatives of ‘unknown merit’, are known to generate lock-in, that is, inflexible outcomes, and this finding has critical implication for the study of economic dynamics and history-dependent processes. In this chapter, we first summarize what is known in the economic literature about the nature of lock-in, and we discuss if lock-ins are really inescapable, especially when innovation is concerned. Second, we employ the replicator dynamics model, suggesting a parallel between monopolization and lock-in, and show that the convergence of a system to the dominance of a single alternative does not have to be inescapable; rather, it is strongly dependent on the regime and parameters characterizing the competition between alternatives. In particular, the interaction of positive reinforcements driving market selection and negative reinforcements occurring at the level of each individual alternative generates outcomes far from the lock-in into one uncontestable alternative.

You do not have access to this content

Uwe Cantner and Holger Graf