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Vincenza Priola

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Gemma L. Bend and Vincenza Priola

This chapter explores the intersection of gender and disability identities based on the study of disabled women’s experiences of work and career. It reports the findings analysed from in-depth interviews with seven employed women who have long-term physical disabilities, focusing on the difficulties that women with a disability experience in the workplace and the implications that these experiences have on women’s identity and their careers. Three themes are discussed: experiences of discrimination; disability and career; and support in employment. The findings show evidence of a conflict between physically disabled women’s self-identity and social identity. Visual cues of one’s identity, such as gender and a physical disability, that makes an individual look different from a non-disabled individual, appeared to impact upon work experiences almost as much as the limitations that a physically disabled body presented. This was particularly evident in appearance-based professions such as beauty therapy or in male-dominated work environments. The findings will be of interest to policy-makers and organisations when implementing future services to support disabled individuals.

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Shafaq Chaudhry and Vincenza Priola

Current knowledge on gender inequality in the workplace heavily relies on Western-centric perspectives which generally do not reflect complexities and lives within other cultures. The chapter explores the gendering of banking work in Pakistan and compares work practices observed at the branch of an Islamic bank and at the branch of a multinational bank, both based in the city of Lahore. The analysis shows how organisational processes and patterns of work in the two banks are not only gendered and embedded in patriarchal systems, but are also heavily influenced by the organisational cultures that characterise these different banks. The chapter discusses the qualitatively different regimes of gender inequalities in the banking sector. It shows how work patterns and the financial emphasis of the two banks influence the ways in which women (and men) negotiate women’s careers and work performance. The chapter brings to the fore the importance of critically analysing gender practices at the intersection between organisation and society, and warns about the unproblematic application of concepts, such as career, to different cultural realities.

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Matthew J. Brannan, Elizabeth Parsons and Vincenza Priola

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Matthew J. Brannan, Elizabeth Parsons and Vincenza Priola

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Branded Lives

The Production and Consumption of Meaning at Work

Edited by Matthew J. Brannan, Elizabeth Parsons and Vincenza Priola

Branded Lives explores the increasingly popular concept of employee branding as a new form of employment relationship based on brand representation. In doing so it examines the ways in which the production and consumption of meaning at work are increasingly mediated by the brand. This insightful collection draws on qualitative empirical studies in a range of contexts to include services, retail and manufacturing organizations. The contributors explore the nuances of employee branding from various disciplinary standpoints such as: organization studies, marketing, human resource management and industrial relations. They take a critical perspective on work and organizations and document the lived experience of work and employment under branded conditions. In investigating the extent to which a variety of organizational strategies seek to mould workplace meanings and practices to further build and sustain brand value and the effectiveness of these in terms of employee responses, the authors question whether the attempt to ‘brand’ workers’ lives actually enhances or diminishes the meaning and experience of work.