You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items

  • Author or Editor: Vladimir Popov x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Ksenia Yudaeva, Maria Gorban and Vladimir Popov

This content is available to you

Acknowledgments

The Rest Beyond the West

Edited by Vladimir Popov and Piotr Dutkiewicz

This content is available to you

Vladimir Popov and Jomo Kwame Sundaram

The chapter reviews catch-up or converging growth in parts of the Global South. By 1950, US per capita national income, adjusted for purchasing power, was nearly five times the world average. Since then, Western Europe and Japan have closed their per capita income gaps with the USA. East Asia, South Asia and some other developing countries have also started to close gaps with the West in recent decades. Thus, after two centuries of growing economic divergence, the world has witnessed an era of uneven convergence between parts of the South and the North. Alternative scenarios and some future implications are considered.

You do not have access to this content

Mapping a New World Order

The Rest Beyond the West

Edited by Vladimir Popov and Piotr Dutkiewicz

This book identifies possible factors responsible for the recent rise of many developing countries. It examines how robust these trends actually are and speculatively predicts the implications and consequences that may result from a continuation of these trends. It also suggests possible scenarios of future development. Ultimately, it argues that the rise of ‘the Rest’ would not only imply geopolitical shifts, but could lead to proliferation of new growth models in the Global South and to profound changes in international economic relations.
This content is available to you

Introduction

The Rest Beyond the West

Vladimir Popov

You do not have access to this content

Why growth rates differ

The Rest Beyond the West

Vladimir Popov

Many agree that the crucial factor of economic growth is institutions in the long term, but there is less agreement on what determines institutional strength. The chapter uses objective measures of the institutional capacity (shadow economy and murder rate) to trace the trajectories of institutional developments in the Global South and discusses hypotheses to explain these trajectories.