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Edited by Shang-Jin Wei, Guanzhong James Wen and Huizhong Zhou

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Edited by Shang-Jin Wei, Guanzhong James Wen and Huizhong Zhou

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Shang-Jin Wei, Guanzhong James Wen and Huizhong Zhou

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Edited by Shang-Jin Wei, Guanzhong James Wen and Huizhong Zhou

This forward-looking volume offers insights into the globalization of the Chinese economy and its accession to the WTO. The contributors provide updated accounts of recent developments in the Chinese economy and examines the implications of China’s accession for the rest of the world.
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Guanzhong James Wen

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Junjie Wen

Attractions are conceived in this chapter as an indispensable force in the matrix of the tourism system. The text reviews the definitions of attractions and considers some of the major models defining the term and the management of the sites. There is a further focus on queues and crowds and the challenges involved in dealing with language differences in international settings and the common tourist concerns about safety. An appreciation of the ways visitors use their time to create and build memorable attraction visits is highlighted for future research

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Wan-wen Chu

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Wen-Shan Yang

Chapter 25 documents the changes in the family system in Taiwan. It shows that the values of Taiwanese traditional families were founded on the ‘father_son axis’, characterized by a priority on family interests, an emphasis on hierarchy and birth order, women’s subordinate status, patrilineal descent, the pursuit of family growth, and the maintenance of a big family system. While some of these characteristics have persisted, families in Taiwan have been increasingly based on a ‘husband_wife axis’, due to the expansion of compulsory education and higher education as well as the rise in women’s self-awareness and labor participation rates. Relatedly, late or no marriage, late or no pregnancy, and increased divorce rates have emerged in Taiwanese society, influencing the power and status of marriage and the family institution in Taiwan.