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Edited by Michális S. Michael and Yücel Vural

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Michális S. Michael and Yücel Vural

In this introductory chapter, Michael and Vural frame the challenge confronting the Cyprus peace process around a series of nagging questions that have eluded progress for over four decades: can third parties (the United Nations, the European Union and others) realistically broker peace, reconciliation and unification in Cyprus? Was 2015–17 really the last chance for a (reunified) resolution to the Cyprus problem? If not, what is the way forward? What of the future? How, will Cyprus and its conflict unfold 10–20 years from now in a post-negotiated situation (whether a unitary, federated, two-state or status quo solution prevails)? What are the means of creating a dialogue under all, or any, of these circumstances? Coming in the midst of the 2015–17 Cyprus talks, the chapter notes the difficulty of ‘shadowing’ ongoing developments while endeavouring to analyse and assess how an imagined solution would affect, and/or deter, the politics of change and continuity.

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Yücel Vural and İbrahim Özejder

Vural and …zejder report the views of the Turkish Cypriot political parties on key topics of the Cyprus dispute. These views tend to vary between conventional and non-conventional positions, representing great diversity across a range to topics including security and guarantees (Turkish guarantees, alternative arrangements, abolition of the 1960 system, international force), federal government and rotating presidency, transition to federalism, territorial adjustments (minimalist, land for peace), and property.

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Cyprus and the Roadmap for Peace

A Critical Interrogation of the Conflict

Edited by Michális S. Michael and Yücel Vural

While 2017 offered much ground for optimism in resolving the longstanding ‘Cyprus problem’, a closer inspection of the differences experienced reveals the complex difficulties that surround the conflict. The impasse introduced a short-lived confidence that concealed the contradictory combustion of a ‘frozen’/dormant conflict. Despite intense high-level negotiations, a way forward has proved elusive, while local constituency expectations are challenging their leaders for control over both process and outcome. This dilemma lies at the heart of this edited volume.
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Yücel Vural, Sertaç Sonan and Michális S. Michael

This chapter examines the dual relationship that the Turkish Cypriot community maintains with the two significant actors of the Cyprus dispute – namely Turkey and the Greek Cypriot community – and argues that the Turkish Cypriot community has been grappling with the dilemma of how to maintain its identity through this binary juxtaposition. Numerically, politically, economically and militarily weaker, as well as internationally isolated, the Turkish Cypriots have always viewed Ankara as its protector against Greek Cypriot hegemony. Yet, growing dependence on Turkey, as it has turned out, posed an equally severe existential threat on its identity, making reaching an accommodation with the Greek Cypriots an urgent necessity. The discrepancy created by the conflicting and insurmountable demands imposed by Turkey and the Greek Cypriots constitutes the very core of the Turkish Cypriot dilemma.