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Justin Yifu Lin and Yan Wang

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Qian Wang and Ping Yan

The concept of responsible innovation (RI) has been of growing interest to international academia in recent years. The use of the theory and approach of RI to conduct research into the construction of ports has both theoretical importance and practical significance in China. This chapter analyses the activities of the port of Dalian in terms of RI, and argues that the focus on environmental protection and corporate social responsibility of the port are consistent with the underlying ideas of RI. Through case study methodology, two typical cases of RI of the port of Dalian are described and analysed. The authors conclude that the implication of RI in the port of Dalian begins by verifying whether the construction of the port corresponds to the idea of RI within a government-orientated mode of RI on the basis of the autonomy of the port and the negotiation of multiple stakeholders. Finally, the chapter discusses the general significance of this mode of RI to the construction of ports in China.

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Wang Jin, Huang Chiachen and Yan Houfu

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Huijiong Wang, Shantong Li and Yan Hong

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Wang Xi, Tang Tang, Lu Kun and Zhang Yan

Abstract This chapter provides a survey on literature of climate change law and policy in developing countries, with key attention to China, India and Brazil. The purpose of the survey is to find out what are the major topics and viewpoints on climate change policy and law in these countries so as to provide researchers with a good basis for further studying the climate change law and policy in developing countries. Many governments of developing countries have made national climate change policies and are dedicated to voluntary mitigation of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Academics from these developing countries are active in discussing the related policy and legal issues but, just like the national policies on climate change, the angles and positions of discussions on climate change are largely influenced by national conditions and national interests of their countries.
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Han Jiang, Patricia Blazey, Yan Wang and Hope Ashiabor

This article examines the comprehensive reform of the Chinese environmental governance system since the early 2010s after the goal of constructing ecological civilization was integrated into China's state policies. Legislative changes have been undertaken in order to improve the environmental governance system and juridical environmental protection has been reinforced to tackle environmental challenges through a revised public interest litigation system. China's current environmental public interest litigation system consists of civil environmental public interest litigation and administrative environmental public interest litigation. Only procuratorates have standing in administrative environmental public interest litigation whereas environmental non-government organizations who are permitted to undertake civil cases are in practice marginalized. Individuals, on the other hand, do not have standing in either civil or administrative environmental public interest litigation cases. The ecological and environmental damages litigation system has been established in order to recognize government agencies that have standing in protecting environmental public interest.

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References

Institutions, Growth and Imbalances

Lu Ming, Zhao Chen, Yongqin Wang, Yan Zhang, Yuan Zhang and Changyuan Luo

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China’s Economic Development

Institutions, Growth and Imbalances

Lu Ming, Zhao Chen, Yongqin Wang, Yan Zhang, Yuan Zhang and Changyuan Luo

The authors identify three major factors in the growth of the Chinese economy: economic decentralization and political centralization; the urban–rural divide; and relational society. These are explored in depth via analyses of factors including urban and rural economic development and their political and social foundations, industrial agglomeration, transitions of public services and governmental responsibilities towards them and developmental imbalances and mechanisms. It is illustrated that whilst contemporary China has obviously made great economic strides, a wide variety of problems are accumulating over time. The book concludes that following three decades of high economic growth, China now faces great challenges for sustainable growth, and the institutions of China’s economy have reached a critical point. Strategies for dealing with these challenges and requirements for the successful future development of China are thus prescribed.
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Lu Ming, Zhao Chen, Yongqin Wang, Yan Zhang, Yuan Zhang and Changyuan Luo

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Political and social foundations of economic development

Institutions, Growth and Imbalances

Lu Ming, Zhao Chen, Yongqin Wang, Yan Zhang, Yuan Zhang and Changyuan Luo