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Samantha D. Hansen and Yannick Griep

Like organizational commitment, research on the ‘psychological contract’ (PC) provides an important framework for helping employers to understand and manage their relationships with employees. A PC represents the employee’s beliefs about mutual obligations exchanged with the employer. This chapter offers an overview of key topics and theoretical refinement in the study of PCs, with special attention to theoretical and empirical connections with organizational commitment. Although organizational commitment is treated primarily as an outcome variable in the extant PC literature, recent theoretical developments in the study of PCs suggest a far more complex role of organizational commitment for future research. The authors discuss several exciting opportunities for the concurrent study of PCs and organizational commitment (for example, how commitment changes over time as a function of PC phase) and explore how the organizational commitment literature can inform future exploration of PC processes.

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Edited by Yannick Griep and Cary Cooper

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Edited by Yannick Griep and Cary Cooper

The different contributions made to this edited book illustrate that the study of psychological contracts has offered critical scholarly and practical insights into the functional and dysfunctional aspects of the employment relationship for several decades. However, as with other fields of research, it behooves the psychological contract field to pause periodically, take stock, explore gaps, and identify new research streams to maintain and expand its impact upon scholarship and practice. An edited book like this offers a good opportunity to see how far we have come with the psychological contract and where the challenges lie ahead. In the chapter, the authors identify and develop three key areas that promise to enrich psychological contract research: 1) time; 2) social context; and 3) the changing nature of work. For each of these key areas, they formulate promising future research questions.

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Edited by Yannick Griep and Cary Cooper

The psychological contract is considered a critical construct in organizational behavior literature because it informs employee emotions, attitudes, and behaviors in the workplace. Although the psychological contract has been explored extensively over the last 50 years, numerous theoretical, conceptual, empirical, methodological, and analytical changes have pushed the field forward. As such, it is time to take stock and move forward. The contributors to this Handbook explore in detail this important component of modern management thinking.
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Edited by Yannick Griep and Samantha D. Hansen

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Edited by Yannick Griep and Samantha D. Hansen

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Yannick Griep and Samantha D. Hansen

The editorial boards of leading organizational behavior journals have launched several calls for more dynamic research. The reason is that there is a growing awareness that most phenomena in organizational behavior are inherently temporal, and that it is important to study how these phenomena and their relationships evolve and change over time, how employees react to these changes, and how trajectories develop over time. Despite the obvious role of time, it bears little empirical acknowledgment in the organizational behavior literature. As a result, we know and understand little about the factors related to the emergence or decline of the phenomena under study, their stability or dynamism, the sequence of their occurrence, or their rate of change. This presents a major barrier to advancing the organizational behavior literature because the role of time is essential to fully comprehend the processes underlying the development and impact of emotions, attitudes, and behaviors in the workplace. This volume includes chapters written by leading scholars whose work shifts focus from a differential to a temporal and process-oriented lens to enhance understanding of how things happen (e.g., interrelationships among temporal aspects of phenomena), as well as why things happen (e.g., exploring determinants of these temporal aspects). In light of the aforementioned limitations in the broad field of organizational behavior, the objective of this particular volume is to challenge and refine the way scholars think about organizational behavior and offer the conceptual, statistical, and methodological tools needed to move the field of organizational behavior forward.

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Edited by Yannick Griep and Samantha D. Hansen

Handbook on the Temporal Dynamics of Organizational Behavior is designed to help scholars begin to address the temporal shortcomings in the extant organizational behavior literature. The handbook provides conceptual and methodological reasons to study organizational behavior from a dynamic perspective and offers new conceptual and theoretical insights on some of the most popular organizational behavior topics. Unlike many other handbooks, this one provides methodological and analytical tools, including syntax and example data files, to help researchers tackle dynamic research questions effectively.
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Justin Weinhardt, Yannick Griep and Joanna Sosnowska

Formal dynamic and computational models are a useful method of conceptualizing complex and dynamic phenomena in psychology because they allow researchers to understand how a representation of a phenomenon behaves as a complex system over time. Despite the clear advantages, organizational psychologists seem to shy away from using formal dynamic and computational models. This chapter focuses on how formal dynamic and computational model approaches can advance our understanding of psychological contract dynamics. The authors first discuss the advantages of formal dynamic and computational models, and how using them can address the existing issues in the psychological contract literature. Then they focus on different levels of analysis and different types of dynamic and computational models that are relevant to psychological contract research. They end this chapter with an overview of useful books, journals, articles, and websites for researchers who are interested in building their own formal dynamic or computational model.