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  • Series: Handbooks of Research Methods in Management series x
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Calvin Burns and Stacey M. Conchie

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Benjamin Waber, Michele Williams, John S. Carroll and Alex ‘Sandy’ Pentland

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Edited by Fergus Lyon, Guido Möllering and Mark N.K. Saunders

With the growing interest in trust in the social sciences, this second edition of the Handbook of Research Methods on Trust provides a fully updated and extended account of quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods for empirical research. While many researchers have already drawn inspiration and insight from the previous edition, the dynamic development of trust research calls for further and deeper engagement with methodological issues, particular methods, practical research experience, and current challenges and innovations as offered by this new edition.
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Edited by Mark N.K. Saunders and Paul Tosey

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Edited by Mark N.K. Saunders and Paul Tosey

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Bob Hamlin

Following increasing numbers of calls for researchers to state their guiding paradigm when publishing their research, this chapter outlines personal experiences of striving to do this. It offers a simplified philosophical framework to aid researchers in locating and taking ownership of their philosophical perspective.

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Eugene Sadler-Smith

This chapter explores the debates surrounding management as a design science rather than an explanatory science. Taking the mission of design science as being to develop actionable knowledge, the positioning of HRD research is considered and the question asked: can HRD research be considered a design science?

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Jeff Gold, Tim Spackman, Diane Marks, Nick Beech, Julia Calver and Adrian Ogun

For the usability of research in HRD to progress, more attention needs to be given to scholarly practice. Roles, strategies and behaviours for HRD scholar-practitioners are explored and critiqued, before the key features of research as a ‘phronetic social science’ are presented. HRD scholar-practitioners’ voices are considered and discussed.