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  • Series: Handbooks of Research Methods in Management series x
  • Human Resource Management x
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Edited by Mark N.K. Saunders and Paul Tosey

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Edited by Mark N.K. Saunders and Paul Tosey

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Bob Hamlin

Following increasing numbers of calls for researchers to state their guiding paradigm when publishing their research, this chapter outlines personal experiences of striving to do this. It offers a simplified philosophical framework to aid researchers in locating and taking ownership of their philosophical perspective.

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Eugene Sadler-Smith

This chapter explores the debates surrounding management as a design science rather than an explanatory science. Taking the mission of design science as being to develop actionable knowledge, the positioning of HRD research is considered and the question asked: can HRD research be considered a design science?

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Jeff Gold, Tim Spackman, Diane Marks, Nick Beech, Julia Calver and Adrian Ogun

For the usability of research in HRD to progress, more attention needs to be given to scholarly practice. Roles, strategies and behaviours for HRD scholar-practitioners are explored and critiqued, before the key features of research as a ‘phronetic social science’ are presented. HRD scholar-practitioners’ voices are considered and discussed.

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Céline Rojon and Almuth McDowall

This chapter explicates systematic review methodology as an evidence-based approach for examining literature, drawing on the authors’ experience of conducting a systematic review as well as on the discussion of other existing systematic reviews. Introducing key tenets, the methodology is benchmarked against alternative reviewing approaches, discussing advantages and potential disadvantages, alongside practicalities and challenges.

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Dawn Langley

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the distinct offer of ethnographic research to HRD practices. In so doing, I will consider the issue of fieldwork and the building of rapport between researcher and participants, an integral element of ethnographic research that can both create and challenge the research relationship.

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Sally Sambrook

Written as an autoethnography, this chapter examines how an HRD researcher can consider his/her own role, bringing personal insight and understanding to wider cultural, sociological issues associated with the complex context of higher education. The aim is to demonstrate, disseminate and celebrate the value of this controversial qualitative methodology.

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Kate Black and Russell Warhurst

This chapter overviews the different approaches to using visual methods in HRD research, offering a ‘toolbox’ from which HRD-researchers might select according to their research needs. We explore the different traditions of visual research design and methods, with a specific focus upon their practical application within the HRD research context.