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  • Series: New Horizons in Regional Science series x
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Settlements at the Edge

Remote Human Settlements in Developed Nations

Edited by Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen and Gertrude Saxinger

Settlements at the Edge examines the evolution, characteristics, functions and shifting economic basis of settlements in sparsely populated areas of developed nations. With a focus on demographic change, the book features theoretical and applied cases which explore the interface between demography, economy, well-being and the environment. This book offers a comprehensive and insightful knowledge base for understanding the role of population in shaping the development and histories of northern sparsely populated areas of developed nations including Alaska (USA), Australia, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland and other nations with territories within the Arctic Circle.
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Edited by Philip Cooke and Luciana Lazzeretti

This book analyses the economic development of cities from the ‘cultural economy’ and ‘creative industry’ perspectives, examining and differentiating them as two related but distinct segments of contemporary city economies. The authors argue that although they are normally conflated, the first is largely subsidized while the second is highly entrepreneurial hence they actually make very different kinds of contribution to a city’s character, attractiveness and competitiveness.
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Edited by Bernard Fingleton

This important book explores original and alternative directions for economic geography following the revolution precipitated by the advent of so-called ‘new economic geography’ (NEG). Whilst, to some extent, the volume could be regarded as part of the inevitable creative destruction of NEG theory, it does promote the continuing role of theoretical and empirical contributions within spatial economic analysis, in which the rationale of scientific analysis and economic logic maintain a central place. With contributions from leading experts in the field, the book presents a comprehensive analysis of the extent to which NEG theory is supported in the real world. By exploring whether NEG theory can be effectively applied to provide practical insights, the authors highlight novel approaches, emerging trends, and promising new lines of enquiry in the wake of advances made by NEG.
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The Rise of the City

Spatial Dynamics in the Urban Century

Edited by Karima Kourtit, Peter Nijkamp and Roger R. Stough

This book examines urban growth and the dynamics that are transforming the city and city regions in the 21st century focusing specifically on the spatial aspects of this process in the “Urban Century”. Forces that are driving city growth include agglomeration spillovers, concentration of innovation and entrepreneurship, diversity of information and knowledge resources, and better amenities and higher wages. These benefits produce a positive reinforcing system that attracts more people with new ideas and information, fuelling innovation, new products and services and more high-wage jobs, thereby attracting more people. Such growth also produces undesirable effects such as air and water pollution, poverty, congestion and crowding. These combined factors both impact and change the geography and spatial dynamics of the city. These transformations and the public policies that may be critical to the quality of life, both today and in the future, are the substance of this book.
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Edited by Masatsugo Tsuji, Emanuelo Giovannetti and Mitsuhiro Kagami

This book, a collaborative effort by researchers from Japan, Italy and the USA, seeks to explore the reasons for industrial clustering in certain regions of Asia, Europe and North America. The studies presented illustrate real examples of industrial clusters, adding anecdotal evidence to the emerging theory of economic geography by exemplifying the centripetal and centrifugal forces that regulate the clustering process. The authors examine clusters in a diverse set of countries including China, Italy, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, the USA and Vietnam. Significantly, the book provides an interesting split between studies of IT and software-related industries, and more traditional sectors, such as steel and vehicle manufacturing.
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Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy

Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Urban Gråsjö and Sofia Wixe

Innovation and entrepreneurship are the prime drivers in the global economy. This scholarly book identifies some of the key forces behind innovation and entrepreneurship at the same time as it closes the gap between science and technology R & D, innovation, entrepreneurship, productivity growth, and internationalization. The expert contributions explore the underlying forces and add substantial theoretical and empirical knowledge to the current state-of-the-art in several research fields including the economics of innovation and entrepreneurship, regional economics, economic geography and international economics.
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Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett and Tina Wallin

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Ossi Pesämaa and Martin Svensson

Principal–agency theory has influenced the formation of corporate boards worldwide. However, the viability of such an outsider-owned model has also been questioned. Weak empirical support between the structure of corporate boards and the performance of firms, and examples of bankruptcies in companies such as Enron, Lehman Brothers and Worldcom, raise doubts about the efficiency of boards. Many Asian countries are dominated by another type of model – insider governance models – relying on families and close relationships instead. Based on the central tenets of principal–agent theory and macro-level data (2006–14), we analyse differences in board efficiency between emerging economies in Asia and western economies. The findings unveil a ‘cultural effect’ where board efficiency better predicts the insider-orientated governance model that is prevalent in eastern economies. The viability of principal–agency theory as a unifying model is discussed, and then practical implications and recommendations for further research are outlined.

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Gary Cook, Yevgeniya Shevtsova and Hans Lööf

The chapter studies the impact of local and global external knowledge on the innovativeness and productivity of the multinational corporations across the UK. Using the global openness of a firm’s regional industry and its regional economy as proxies for global knowledge flows, the chapter provides new evidence of local and global knowledge spillovers. We find the evidence of positive cluster effects for both strength in the firm’s own industry and the scale and diversity of the industrial base in the firm’s NUTS2 area. We also find that the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) in the firm’s line of activity and NUTS2 area has a negative effect on both its patenting and productivity growth. The impact of access to knowledge-intensive professional services is positive for foreign MNEs, except for the high-technology establishments, and positive and significant for the productivity growth in domestic MNEs.

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Trudy-Ann Stone

One of the most salient features of the modern economy is the globalization of production, and one key actor contributing to this development is the multinational firm. Understanding where multinational firms locate and how they operate is at the heart of academic disciplines such as international business and, more recently, international trade. An important factor shaping the location decision is the role of bilateral distance between the home and host countries. In particular, researchers have shown that cultural, institutional, geographical and economic distance between home and host countries all have a bearing on the firm’s location decision. However, ongoing developments call into question current understanding of the role of bilateral distance. This chapter reviews the literature on the effect of bilateral distance between the home and host countries on the location behaviour of multinationals, highlighting key areas for future research to address.