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Edited by Philip Cooke and Luciana Lazzeretti

This book analyses the economic development of cities from the ‘cultural economy’ and ‘creative industry’ perspectives, examining and differentiating them as two related but distinct segments of contemporary city economies. The authors argue that although they are normally conflated, the first is largely subsidized while the second is highly entrepreneurial hence they actually make very different kinds of contribution to a city’s character, attractiveness and competitiveness.
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Edited by Bernard Fingleton

This important book explores original and alternative directions for economic geography following the revolution precipitated by the advent of so-called ‘new economic geography’ (NEG). Whilst, to some extent, the volume could be regarded as part of the inevitable creative destruction of NEG theory, it does promote the continuing role of theoretical and empirical contributions within spatial economic analysis, in which the rationale of scientific analysis and economic logic maintain a central place. With contributions from leading experts in the field, the book presents a comprehensive analysis of the extent to which NEG theory is supported in the real world. By exploring whether NEG theory can be effectively applied to provide practical insights, the authors highlight novel approaches, emerging trends, and promising new lines of enquiry in the wake of advances made by NEG.
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Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy

Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Urban Gråsjö and Sofia Wixe

Innovation and entrepreneurship are the prime drivers in the global economy. This scholarly book identifies some of the key forces behind innovation and entrepreneurship at the same time as it closes the gap between science and technology R & D, innovation, entrepreneurship, productivity growth, and internationalization. The expert contributions explore the underlying forces and add substantial theoretical and empirical knowledge to the current state-of-the-art in several research fields including the economics of innovation and entrepreneurship, regional economics, economic geography and international economics.
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The Regional and Urban Policy of the European Union

Cohesion, Results-Orientation and Smart Specialisation

Philip McCann

The regional and urban development policy of the European Union, or more precisely, EU Cohesion Policy, is undergoing change. This development is driven by the enormous transformations in European regions and by shifts in thinking and analysis. The issues raised by the changes to regional and urban development policy in Europe span many academic disciplines and build on different research methodologies. A broad approach is required in order to address these issues and this book explicitly incorporates insights from a range of different disciplines. After examining the major regional and urban features of the European economy and discussing the analytical underpinnings of the current re-design to EU Cohesion Policy, the book also aims to provide a road map of the various EU regional and urban data-sources which are available to researchers and policy-makers. This book is aimed at all economists, geographers, regional scientists, spatial planners, transportation scientists, sociologists, urban studies researchers, environmental scholars, political scientists and policy-analysts who are interested in regional and urban issues.
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Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett and Tina Wallin

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Ossi Pesämaa and Martin Svensson

Principal–agency theory has influenced the formation of corporate boards worldwide. However, the viability of such an outsider-owned model has also been questioned. Weak empirical support between the structure of corporate boards and the performance of firms, and examples of bankruptcies in companies such as Enron, Lehman Brothers and Worldcom, raise doubts about the efficiency of boards. Many Asian countries are dominated by another type of model – insider governance models – relying on families and close relationships instead. Based on the central tenets of principal–agent theory and macro-level data (2006–14), we analyse differences in board efficiency between emerging economies in Asia and western economies. The findings unveil a ‘cultural effect’ where board efficiency better predicts the insider-orientated governance model that is prevalent in eastern economies. The viability of principal–agency theory as a unifying model is discussed, and then practical implications and recommendations for further research are outlined.

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Gary Cook, Yevgeniya Shevtsova and Hans Lööf

The chapter studies the impact of local and global external knowledge on the innovativeness and productivity of the multinational corporations across the UK. Using the global openness of a firm’s regional industry and its regional economy as proxies for global knowledge flows, the chapter provides new evidence of local and global knowledge spillovers. We find the evidence of positive cluster effects for both strength in the firm’s own industry and the scale and diversity of the industrial base in the firm’s NUTS2 area. We also find that the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) in the firm’s line of activity and NUTS2 area has a negative effect on both its patenting and productivity growth. The impact of access to knowledge-intensive professional services is positive for foreign MNEs, except for the high-technology establishments, and positive and significant for the productivity growth in domestic MNEs.

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Trudy-Ann Stone

One of the most salient features of the modern economy is the globalization of production, and one key actor contributing to this development is the multinational firm. Understanding where multinational firms locate and how they operate is at the heart of academic disciplines such as international business and, more recently, international trade. An important factor shaping the location decision is the role of bilateral distance between the home and host countries. In particular, researchers have shown that cultural, institutional, geographical and economic distance between home and host countries all have a bearing on the firm’s location decision. However, ongoing developments call into question current understanding of the role of bilateral distance. This chapter reviews the literature on the effect of bilateral distance between the home and host countries on the location behaviour of multinationals, highlighting key areas for future research to address.

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Makoto Hirano, Mitsuhiro Kurashige and Kiyonori Sakakibara

Yanagiya Machinery Co. Ltd was initially involved in processing local fish to steamed fish paste, as one of the small regional enterprises in Japanese traditional craft-like industries, over 100 years ago. However, they have recently grown to be a medium-sized enterprise with over 150 employees and annual sales of over 4 billion yen. Their current business areas are designing, manufacturing and selling machines for producing processed foods – mainly steamed fish paste. Nowadays, they are developing and exporting machines for a variety of manufacturing needs within the processed foods industry. This chapter describes how they have shifted their operations to such a growing market domain and how they have developed original technologies with competitive competence. Their experience of transforming the business could be instructive to other regional small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in declining manufacturing industries.

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Ola Olsson

This chapter is focused on how the information and communication technology (ICT) context has nourished the industrial dynamic literature stream when it comes to the innovation process. It does so by using a life-cycle approach on key node papers with a specific focus on interaction and collaboration activates between ICT firms during the past decades. According to the study these activities have nourished the process in different stages of the innovation life-cycle. In addition, choice of learning strategy seems to decide the strength of relationships and ultimately the potential magnitude of innovation and technological change. The practical implication is that ICT firms seem to have moved away from the vertical strategy of doing it all in-house. Instead, there are several indications of an open way of working which push the innovation process forward.