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  • Series: Advances in Chinese Economic Studies series x
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China’s Integration with the Global Economy

WTO Accession, Foreign Direct Investment and International Trade

Edited by Chunlai Chen

China’s accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001 was widely regarded as a major milestone in the development of the Chinese economy as well as the multilateral trading system. This book provides a remarkable background of information about China’s economy after WTO accession and analyses many important issues concerning China’s economic growth, international trade, transparency of trade policy, regional trade arrangements, foreign direct investment, banking sector liberalization, exchange rate reform, agricultural trade and energy demand.
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China’s Capital Markets

Challenges from WTO Membership

Edited by Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung and Qingfeng ‘Wilson’ Liu

China’s economy has been growing rapidly since the late 1970s and is expected to maintain this momentum in the foreseeable future. Coupled with the biggest population in the world, there is tremendous growth potential for China’s capital markets and financial services industry, both vital to the continued development of the economy. The contributors present research on all facets of China’s markets including: stock and bond markets; futures and over-the-counter markets; regulatory issues; and the development and roles of financial institutions such as brokerage firms, banks and insurance companies. Also addressed are the recent performance of equity markets, the emergence of small and medium enterprises, and the state banks’ bids to be listed in overseas stock exchanges. Taken together, the book sheds a welcome light on China’s overall economic growth.
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Shuji Yao, Zhongwei Han and Dan Luo

The Chinese insurance industry has experienced rapid development during the past decade. This original book is the first English language study in the literature to address the efficiency issue of the Chinese insurance sector, and presents a comprehensive review on alternative methodologies for analyzing firm efficiency.
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China’s Economy in the Post-WTO Environment

Stock Markets, FDI and Challenges of Sustainability

Edited by Lilai Xu

The book explores the implications of both the extension of the market into key parts of the Chinese economy and the integration of China into the global economy. The main focus of the book is on the role and nature of China’s financial system and its ability to transform enterprise and household behaviour and the performance of investment finance, notably in the context of a two-way flow of foreign direct investment. All the extensive chapters highlight the issue of sustainability – some see the incompleteness of market reform as a problem; others are more willing to accept a pragmatic blending of the operation of the free market and government intervention.
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James Laurenceson and Joseph C.H. Chai

This book is a comprehensive, balanced and realistic assessment of China’s financial reform program and future direction. Covering not only the banking sector but also non-bank financial institutions, stock market development and external financial liberalization, the authors examine the impact of financial reform on economic development in China during the reform period. This volume will facilitate a more accurate assessment of the Chinese approach to financial reform, and will therefore, allow more informed future policy choices for both China and other developing and transitional countries.
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China’s Long-Term Economic Development

How Have Economy and Governance Evolved since 500 BC?

Hongjun Zhao

This book examines the evolution of Chinese governmental governance and its long-lasting impact on Chinese economic development, firstly by examining the formation of Chinese style governance, the core contents of this governance and its vitality compared to other governance patterns in Chinese history. Secondly, this book discusses the effectiveness of this governance in supporting economic development before the Song dynasty and its failure in serving economic development during the past three to five centuries. Ultimately, Hongjun Zhao predicts the direction Chinese governance will take in the next 20 years.
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Hongjun Zhao

This chapter discusses the background and significance of the study, and introduces the main subjects and basic concepts of the book, such as the peasant economy and governmental governance. The author presents an overview of the book, the research method used, and conclusion, and indicates the innovation and limitation of the study.

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Hongjun Zhao

This chapter provides a literature review of the reasons why China developed earlier than Europe before 1400 but became backward gradually after 1500, which was broadly defined as the so-called Needham puzzle. The author reviews the most relevant literatures in economics, sociology, history, political science, philosophy, and so on, comparing their hypotheses and arguments, indicating the methodological biases in the different disciplines, putting forward the criteria of analysis of the Needham puzzle, and selecting some new hypotheses that economists can use to analyse the long-term economic development of China during the past thousand years.

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Hongjun Zhao

This chapter analyses the behavior of peasants and their households in Chinese history. It critically reviews the theory of the imbalanced ratio of population and land and discusses China’s long-term economic development from a macro perspective. The author analyses the various constraints faced by Chinese peasants and their families and uses a simple model to explain the production choice of peasant families. Evidence about the income and expenditure of representative peasant households in China’s major dynasties is then provided followed by a case study about a machine handicraft factory replaced by a Chinese traditional cotton textile handicraft workshop.

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Hongjun Zhao

This chapter discusses the formation and consolidation of the petty peasant economy in Chinese history and the efficiency advantage, status, and impacts of it in Chinese economy and society. The author analyses its important institutional connection with Chinese governance using a long-term institutional framework, discusses its main characteristics and its impact on the inertial pattern of Chinese governance, and finally, draws the conclusion that the economic nature of centralized governance in Chinese history is an institutional equilibrium.