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  • Series: Elgar Studies in Legal Theory x
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Understanding the Nature of Law

A Case for Constructive Conceptual Explanation

Michael Giudice

Understanding the Nature of Law explores methodological questions about how best to explain law. Among these questions, one is central: is there something about law which determines how it should be theorized? This novel book explains the importance of conceptual explanation by situating its methods and goals in relation to, rather than in competition with, social scientific and moral theories of law.
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Law’s Political Foundations

Rivers, Rifles, Rice, and Religion

John O. Haley

Law’s Political Foundations explains the development of the two basic systems of public and private law and their historical transformations. Examining the historical development of law in China, Japan, Western Europe, and Hispanic America, Haley argues that law is a product, rather than a constitutive element, of political systems.
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Domesticating Kelsen

Towards the Pure Theory of English Law

Alexander Orakhelashvili

There exists a genuine degree of scepticism as to whether Hans Kelsen’s pure theory of law can rationalise the intricacies of the English legal system. This ground-breaking book examines pertinent aspects of English law relating to constitutional patterns of law-making, the relationship between law and policy, and the ultimate efficacy of the legal order, through the pure theory’s prism. It demonstrates that while Kelsen’s theory is highly suitable to examine some of these issues, in relation to some aspects of English law it actually possesses the analytical cutting edge.
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Jan M. Broekman and Frank Fleerackers

Conversation and argument concerning laws and legal situations take place throughout society and at all levels, yet the language of these conversations differs greatly from that of the courtroom. This insightful book considers the gap between everyday discussion about law and the artificial, technical language developed by lawyers, judges and other legal specialists. In doing so, it explores the intriguing possibilities for future synthesis, a problem often neglected by legal theory.
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The End of Law

How Law’s Claims Relate to Law’s Aims

David McIlroy

The End of Law applies Augustine’s questions to modern legal philosophy as well as offering a critical theory of natural law that draws on Augustine’s ideas. McIlroy argues that such a critical natural law theory is: realistic but not cynical about law’s relationship to justice and to violence, can diagnose ways in which law becomes deformed and pathological, and indicates that law is a necessary but insufficient instrument for the pursuit of justice. Positioning an examination of Augustine’s reflections on law in the context of his broader thought, McIlroy presents an alternative approach to natural law theory, drawing from critical theory, postmodern thought, and political theologies in conversation with Augustine.
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David Grant and Lyria Bennett Moses

This book presents an entirely new way of understanding technology, as the successor to the dominant ideologies that have underpinned the thought and practices of the Western world. Like the preceding ideologies of Deity, State and Market, technology displays the features of a modern myth, promising to deal with our existential concerns on condition of our subjection to them. Utilising robust empirical evidence, Lyria Bennett Moses and David Grant argue that the pathway out of this mythological maze is the production of means to establish a new sense of political, corporate and personal self-responsibility.
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Law and Evil

The Evolutionary Perspective

Wojciech Załuski

Law and Evil presents an alternative evolutionary picture of man, focusing on the origins and nature of human evil, and demonstrating its useful application in legal-philosophical analyses. Using this representation of human nature, Wojciech Załuski analyses the development of law, which he interprets as moving from evolutionary ethics to genuine ethics, as well as arguing in favour of metaethical realism and ius naturale.
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Bert van Roermund

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Bert van Roermund

This chapter clarifies the overall question of the book: how does identity as selfhood (rather than sameness) in a plural mode (‘we, ourselves’) affect the twin concepts of democracy and the rule of law? It does so by pointing to three debates: first, on the meaning of demos in the EU after the Lisbon decision by the German Constitutional Court; second, on the validity of ‘imposed’ constitutions in the Asian context (Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea); third, on the proper agent of constitutional review (judge or legislator) in the US, compared to some European countries. Thus, these discussions throw initial light on the issues to be dealt with: the people as an acting subject, the plural ‘self’ of this subject and the joint action it is supposed to perform. Arguably, the philosophical approach called ‘phenomenology’ (in Taylor’s terms ‘radical reflexivity’) provides innovative access to this question.

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Bert van Roermund