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Morten Huse

In the first chapter I introduce the urgency and the main topic of the book: Is there a crisis in academic research, and how do we solve it? True scholarship is under attack, and there is a scholarly ecosystem equilibrium that is supporting a ‘publish or perish’ culture. Fortunately, there are many initiatives to change the equilibrium of this ecosystem. My particular contribution is to present and illustrate a sharing philosophy of research and scholarship.

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Morten Huse

I start this chapter with reflections about the present ‘publish or perish’ culture, and concerns about where our profession is going. I go on to discuss Boyer’s benchmark contribution about scholarship. Finally, I present a scholarly ecosystem consisting of institutions, audience, message, channels, journals and community. Institutions are formed by a neoliberal market ideology with external incentives. The audience is typically a narrow group in academia. The message is incremental; gap spotting and focus is usually short term and based on the past. The channels are premiere journals and they are tenure track driven and create publishing technicians. It is a community where the winner takes it all; it is based on relying on the self.

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Morten Huse

The Academy of Management (AOM) is a global association of scholars and, directly or indirectly, it influences global scholarly practices. It is influencing institutions, the scholarly community, the message, ways of communication and the audience. AOM has a strong momentum, but the direction attributed to it is not always in line with reflections from the AOM leadership and its presidents. The chapter builds on the presidential addresses of the outgoing AOM presidents. The presidents had concerns about the development of the role of scholars and scholarly development. The concerns for the future of academia, the future of scholars, the future of the profession and the future of universities and business schools have always existed, but the seriousness of the POP culture and the urgency to nurture true scholarship seem to be growing. Several of the former presidents argued that theory and practice are not connected.

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Morten Huse

EURAM (The European Academy of Management) aims at being a European-based community of engaged management scholars. It is an open, inclusive and cross-cultural community. EURAM represents diversity and context-specific scholarship and research. Is there a need for European-based research? EURAM’s context-specific characteristics represent a challenge and alternative to the global contributions of the AOM. EURAM has its distinct contributions and character, but I have also seen its contribution as a tugboat that supports the big tankship of the AOM in management research. Can a European-based academy contribute as an alternative or supplement to AOM? EURAM’s presidential activities were aimed at solving challenges facing many academies of management. In this chapter, I mainly lean on two publications I wrote as EURAM president from 2010 to 2012. The first publication was at the beginning of my presidential period, while the second was reflections presented in my presidential outgoing speech.

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Morten Huse

Many initiatives have been taken to change the ecosystem equilibrium. They vary depending on the actors behind them. Rationales, objectives and means vary. Several scholars and other actors are crusading against the lack of meaning in the ‘publish or perish’ culture. Some go as far as to argue that a new science of management research is needed; that we need to rethink our professional norms, and cultivate a more scholarly identity. In this chapter, I present and sort various initiatives and suggestions for change – initiatives to make meaning of our research and scholarship. I sort some of these initiatives in line with how they have focused on different parts of the ecosystem: on addressing the institutions, the audience, the message, the channels and the community. The San Francisco Declaration (DORA) and Responsible Research in Business and Management (RRBM) get particular attention. I argue that coordination among the various initiatives is needed.

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Morten Huse

Building communities of engaged scholars or creating a vibrant community is challenging. Continuity of research is important. Being involved in a programmatic line of research on one topic may help young scholars in their transition to become experienced and successful scholars. This is what we experienced during the Norefjell workshops and in the Norefjell community. This chapter is about the Norefjell workshops. The Norefjell story is about developing a community around a research stream about actual board behaviour and value-creating boards. Norefjell is a story about programmatic research based on a sharing philosophy. The Norefjell workshops have called for responsible science, promoting transparency, open sharing and reproducibility. The workshops have had a social purpose in caring for the participants, with a focus on second and third-order effects through teaching and educating the participants and through sharing, supporting and mentoring.

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Morten Huse

Scholarship goes beyond learning the tricks of the trade. It is holistic, and we cannot make a split between our scholarly lives and us as private persons. True scholarship is our lives. It is about the integration of head, heart and hands. In this chapter I reflect on my late career period at Witten/Herdecke University (UW/H). It shaped my ways of formulating, exploring and developing our academic community. I use concepts such as grand challenges, social engagement, holistic and reflexive. The open approach includes a dialogue where all participants share and learn from each other. UW/H is embedded in anthroposophical and Humboldtian traditions. These are features of a lighthouse in showing the direction for true scholarship. In Witten I started to define myself as a mentor. In my research, teaching and mentoring I have taken up a policy of starting with the heart. Being a mentor is about working with hearts.

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Morten Huse

In this chapter I focus on impact-driven and involved research. I present lessons from the ‘getting women on boards’ research agenda, about socially committed scholarship, mentoring, polymorphic research, introspection and the Champagne method. How, when and for whom does our research make an impact? Our research should be fuelled by a natural desire to make an impact. Impact appears over time, and we should consider our impact through a lifelong scholarship. Through the whole chapter, I follow the experiences from my work about women on boards (WoB). At the end of this chapter, I present some examples about polymorphic research and how it stimulates the relaxation of some assumptions in the debate and research about WoB.

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Morten Huse

I started this book by questioning if true scholarship is in crisis, and I argued that our scholarly values are under attack. Today we have a scholarly ecosystem equilibrium that is upholding a ‘publish or perish’ culture. My particular response and contribution is to illustrate a sharing philosophy of doing research. My focus is more on what scholars are, rather than what scholarship is. In this chapter, I present themes which are present throughout the book. These are: ‘Life is too short to drink bad wine’, about the scholarly life cycle; ‘more than one boat is needed on our voyage to true scholarship’, about global values and manoeuvring in international waters; and ‘we need lighthouses that can help us manoeuvre’. Alvesson used the term ‘returning to meaning’. I use ‘Ritorno al passato’, but that will also help us evaluate the present for responding to the future.