You are looking at 1 - 10 of 39 items

  • Series: New Horizons in Entrepreneurship series x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

A General Theory of Entrepreneurship

The Individual-Opportunity Nexus

Scott Shane

In the first exhaustive treatment of the field in 20 years, Scott Shane extends the analysis of entrepreneurship by offering an overarching conceptual framework that explains the different parts of the entrepreneurial process – the opportunities, the people who pursue them, the skills and strategies used to organize and exploit opportunities, and the environmental conditions favorable to them – in a coherent way.
You do not have access to this content

Edited by Candida G. Brush, Nancy M. Carter, Elizabeth J. Gatewood, Patricia G. Greene and Myra M. Hart

Enterprising new firms drive economic growth, and women around the world are important contributors to that growth. As entrepreneurs, they seize opportunities, develop and deliver new goods and services and, in the process, create wealth for themselves, their families, communities, and countries. This volume explores the role women entrepreneurs play in this economic progress, highlighting the challenges they encounter in launching and growing their businesses, and providing detailed studies of how their experiences vary from country to country.
This content is available to you

Evan J. Douglas

This content is available to you

Norris Krueger

This content is available to you

Evan J. Douglas

This content is available to you

Evan J. Douglas

This chapter lays the foundation for the study of entrepreneurial intention, defining terms and investigating the proactive, risk-taking, and innovation aspects of entrepreneurship, before outlining the commercial versus social entrepreneurship dichotomy, entrepreneurial attitudes and abilities, and the theory of planned behaviour.

You do not have access to this content

Evan J. Douglas

This chapter introduces and distinguishes between various types of entrepreneurial behaviour, including necessity versus opportunity entrepreneurs; profit-maximising versus profit-satisficing entrepreneurs; growth-oriented versus independence, lifestyle, salary substitute, and leisure-seeking entrepreneurs; hybrid versus single-focus entrepreneurs; intrapreneurship; corporate entrepreneurship; spinoffs; and spinouts.

You do not have access to this content

Evan J. Douglas

This chapter argues that individuals want to maximise their personal wellbeing (also known as psychic utility) and choose entrepreneurial behaviour if it seems to promise the greatest perceived desirability and a sufficiently high perceived feasibility of success. These two main tenets of the theory of planned behaviour are discussed in detail, and self-regulation, overconfidence, optimism, and solo versus team entrepreneurship are also discussed in this context.

You do not have access to this content

Evan J. Douglas

This chapter outlines issues that arise in the empirical study of entrepreneurial intention, including construct specification and measurement problems; social desirability bias; common-method bias; general versus specific-opportunity entrepreneurial intention; non-representative samples; and the use of correlational methods that are incongruent with the theory of holistic decision making that they seek to measure.

You do not have access to this content

Evan J. Douglas

This chapter focuses on the intention to start a “self-oriented” new venture for the purpose of private gain for the shareholders of the new venture. The private gain may be both monetary (profit) and non-monetary (psychic income, or job satisfaction). Profit maximisation is contrasted with profit satisficing, leading to the distinction between profit and growth-oriented entrepreneurs and psychic income-seeking entrepreneurs. An empirical study of the antecedents of growth-oriented versus independence-oriented entrepreneurial intention is reported, demonstrating different drivers of these two pathways to entrepreneurship.