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  • Series: New Horizons in Regional Science series x
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Settlements at the Edge

Remote Human Settlements in Developed Nations

Edited by Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen and Gertrude Saxinger

Settlements at the Edge examines the evolution, characteristics, functions and shifting economic basis of settlements in sparsely populated areas of developed nations. With a focus on demographic change, the book features theoretical and applied cases which explore the interface between demography, economy, well-being and the environment. This book offers a comprehensive and insightful knowledge base for understanding the role of population in shaping the development and histories of northern sparsely populated areas of developed nations including Alaska (USA), Australia, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland and other nations with territories within the Arctic Circle.
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Robert Stimson, Roger R. Stough and Maria Salazar

The authors of this comprehensive book provide a detailed rationale and original theory for the study of leadership and institutional factors, including entrepreneurship, in the growth and development of cities and regions. They demonstrate why leadership, institutions and entrepreneurship can – and indeed do – play a crucial enhancing role as key elements in the process of regional endogenous growth.
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Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson and Roger R. Stough

This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of current research on regional competition and co-operation. Developing our current understanding of the new role of regions and their behaviour, this book addresses questions such as: How and why do regions compete? How does competition between border regions operate? Which regions are successful and which regions fail? What are the implications of regional competition in terms of resource allocation, the location of economic activities and the distribution of incomes? The book illuminates a number of critical theoretical end empirical issues relating to the competitive and cooperative nature of regions, as well as highlighting a number of new case studies from a variety of countries.
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Regional Knowledge Economies

Markets, Clusters and Innovation

Philip Cooke, Carla De Laurentis, Franz Tödtling and Michaela Trippl

This original and timely book presents the most comprehensive, empirically based analysis of clustering dynamics in the high-technology sector across liberal and co-ordinated market economies.
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Edited by Matthias Ruth, Kieran Donaghy and Paul Kirshen

In its development of methodologies and their applications to individual regions, this book presents a rich set of insights and a set of guides for investment and policymaking. Each of the six studies focuses on a finer geographic scale than is customary in integrated assessment research. They introduce innovations for impact analysis and contribute to the knowledge of localized experiences of climate change – how it affects a variety of sectors, how different stakeholders perceive its implications and adapt to it, and how decision support systems can promote dialogues between researchers, stakeholders and policymakers.
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The Regional Economics of Knowledge and Talent

Local Advantage in a Global Context

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson and Roger R. Stough

The distinguished contributors advance the current research frontier in three novel directions which focus on: the role of human capital and talent for creativity, entrepreneurship and regional development; the role of institutions for the behaviour of firms and entrepreneurs; and the influence of the global context on the location, export and innovation behaviour of firms in a knowledge economy.
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International Knowledge and Innovation Networks

Knowledge Creation and Innovation in Medium-technology Clusters

Riccardo Cappellin and Rüdiger Wink

This book explores the distinct nature of innovation in medium technology industrial sectors – which are the key to European international competitiveness – and examines the recent changes of networks within regional clusters.
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The Rise of the City

Spatial Dynamics in the Urban Century

Edited by Karima Kourtit, Peter Nijkamp and Roger R. Stough

This book examines urban growth and the dynamics that are transforming the city and city regions in the 21st century focusing specifically on the spatial aspects of this process in the “Urban Century”. Forces that are driving city growth include agglomeration spillovers, concentration of innovation and entrepreneurship, diversity of information and knowledge resources, and better amenities and higher wages. These benefits produce a positive reinforcing system that attracts more people with new ideas and information, fuelling innovation, new products and services and more high-wage jobs, thereby attracting more people. Such growth also produces undesirable effects such as air and water pollution, poverty, congestion and crowding. These combined factors both impact and change the geography and spatial dynamics of the city. These transformations and the public policies that may be critical to the quality of life, both today and in the future, are the substance of this book.
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Knowledge Borders

Temporary Labor Mobility and the Canada–US Border Region

Kathrine E. Richardson

Key sections of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) deal with temporary labor mobility. Ideally, NAFTA status provisions should make the temporary movement of professionals easier across the border of all NAFTA countries. However, in the case of some key sectors, it is arguably not the case. Within the context of recent literature on cross-border trade, city regions, regionalism, international labor mobility, and post-September 11 security measures, this book probes the dynamics of transitory immigration of ‘knowledge-workers’ between the North American west coast city regions of Vancouver, Seattle, and the greater San Francisco Bay and Silicon Valley area. This book includes in-depth interviews with Canadian and US immigration officials, immigration attorneys and executives and professional staff of new technology firms and Fortune 500 companies. It ultimately explores whether or not the Canada–US border is an impediment to the development of a cross-border high-tech clusters.
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Kathrine E. Richardson

In order to begin to answer the driving research question as to whether the Canada–US border impedes the development of the Cascadia region as a high-technology region, a number of more general themes were relevant in framing this study. Thus, this chapter provides a review of diverse literatures and frameworks that have hitherto rarely been juxtaposed, namely the geography of borders and borderlands; the spatial dynamics of high-technology regions; transnationalism and labor mobility of the highly skilled; and cross-border institutions that facilitate or impede labor mobility. The chapter closes with a discussion of how they might be applied to research on highly skilled labor mobility within the Cascadia corridor specifically.