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  • Series: Research Handbooks in International Law series x
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Edited by James A.R. Nafziger and Stephen F. Ross

This Handbook presents a comprehensive collection of essays by leading scholars and practitioners in the burgeoning field of international sports law.
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Edited by Malgosia Fitzmaurice, David M. Ong and Panos Merkouris

This wide-ranging and comprehensive Handbook examines recent developments in international environmental law (IEL) and the crossover effects of this expansion on other areas of international law, such as trade law and the law of the sea.
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Edited by Geraint Howells, Iain Ramsay, Thomas Wihelmsson and David Kraft

Consumer law and policy has emerged in the last half-century as a major policy concern for all nations. This Handbook of original contributions provides an international and comparative analysis of central issues in consumer law and policy in developed and developing economies.
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Edited by Jan Klabbers and Åsa Wallendahl

This pioneering Research Handbook with contributions from renowned experts, provides an overview of the general doctrines making up the law of international organizations.
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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Susan C. Breau and Katja L. H. Samuel

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Christopher Newdick

One of law’s central concerns is equality of rights, yet law is conspicuous by its absence from the debate about global inequality. Extraordinary numbers of people have inadequate access to the basic necessities of life: food, water, education, health and a decent environment. For billions of people, this is a disaster. At a time of unparalleled global affluence, when the need for sharing global wealth and opportunity is more important than ever, the gap between rich and poor is expanding. How should we explain this process? This chapter considers Karl Polanyi’s contribution to our understanding of social rights and the ways in which public interests evolved during the last century. The discussion examines how subsequent norms of global capitalism have encouraged private interests to undermine collective welfare and the consequences of the law’s failure to engage itself with the problem.