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Rethinking Cyberlaw

A New Vision for Internet Law

Jacqueline Lipton

The rapid increase in Internet usage over the past several decades has led to the development of new and essential areas of legislation and legal study. Jacqueline Lipton takes on the thorny question of how to define the field that has come to be known variously as cyberlaw, cyberspace law or Internet law. Unlike much of the existing literature, this book tackles the question with the benefit of hindsight and draws on several decades of legal developments in the United States and abroad that help illustrate the scope of the field.
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Steven Mulroy

An Introduction which begins with three recent examples of national elections where the majority will was frustrated and summarizes the book. It explains how winner-take-all elections are to blame, and how proportional representation with ranked choice voting can help.

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Steven Mulroy

Discusses the history and current operation of the Electoral College; why it needs to be replaced; and how the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact can do so without the need for a federal constitutional amendment.

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Steven Mulroy

Explains how the equal votes-per-state rule in the Senate skews the vote in a pro-Republican way; why that can’t be fixed; but how abolishing the filibuster can ameliorate the Senate’s anti-majoritarian skew.

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Steven Mulroy

Shows that U.S. House of Representative districts are seriously gerrymandered; that gerrymandering is worse now than before; how some of that relates to intentional partisan mischief, but a lot of it is the inevitable result of “demographic clustering,” the tendency in recent decades for Democrats to cluster in urban areas.

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Steven Mulroy

Discusses how courts have monitored and policed racial gerrymanders but have been reluctant to do so with partisan gerrymanders. Also explains that even if the latter were to change, it would only address the most extreme gerrymanders, leaving a lot of less blatant and “unintentional” gerrymanders untouched.

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Steven Mulroy

Discusses how nonpartisan redistricting commissions would help significantly with gerrymandering, but wouldn’t fully address the problem, both because of demographic clustering, and also because gerrymandering is inherent in single-member district systems.

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Steven Mulroy

Introduces the reader to ranked choice voting, where voters rank their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd preferences, etc., through discussion of instant runoff voting, used to elect single persons such as mayor, district attorney, or a representative from a single-member district.

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Steven Mulroy

Discusses proportional representation and the single transferable vote, a ranked choice voting system used to elect several or more legislators from a multimember district.

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Steven Mulroy

Explains how the concepts developed in Chapters 4–8 can be applied on the state and local level.