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Susan Helper, Marcus Stanley and Daniel Luria

3. Creating innovation networks among manufacturing firms: how effective extension programs work Susan Helper and Marcus Stanley INTRODUCTION Between its most recent peak employment level in 2000 and 2004, the US manufacturing sector lost over 2.5 million jobs. This represents almost one fifth of its pre-recession total. The question of how to stop this catastrophic employment loss is clearly a critical one, but there are no easy answers. Manufacturers are eligible for a variety of general business subsidies; the vast majority of these are tax abatements for

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Andrew Warren and Chris Gibson

20.  Manufacturing stoke: emergence, transformation and consolidation in the surfboard industry Andrew Warren and Chris Gibson INTRODUCTION This chapter traces the emergence, transformation and consolidation of the surfboard manufacturing industry. With historical antecedents in ancient Polynesian cultures, surfboard making has evolved from a small- cale do- t- ourself (DIY) activity into a fors i y malized commercial industry. Since the late 1950s surfboards have been manufactured in industrial- tyle workshops located adjacent to popular surfing places. In

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Rachel Mulhall

18.  Intermediate manufacturing: profit, dependency and value attainment in supply chains Rachel Mulhall INTRODUCTION The intermediate metal processing (IMP) industry manufactures metal components that are incorporated into a range of end- ser markets. The industry comprises two u principal activities: forging (Standard Industrial Classification (SIC)1 2003 code 28.4) and casting (SIC 2003 code 27.5) of metal. Both industries produce a range of metal products, from basic shapes to complex fabrications of multiple components, and for a diverse set of markets and

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Teis Hansen and Lars Winther

28.  Manufacturing in the knowledge economy: innovation in low- ech industries t Teis Hansen and Lars Winther INTRODUCTION Recent studies stress the relevance of a broad conceptualization of the knowledge economy which goes beyond the strong, current policy focus on high-ech industries. t Today, low- ech industries continue to have a significant role in European manufacturt ing in terms of employment, value added and export. However, the character and activities of these industries are profoundly changing as they become increasingly knowledge intensive. Thus

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Dariusz Wójcik

9.  Innovation and stock markets: international evidence on manufacturing and services Dariusz Wójcik 9.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter investigates the relationship between firms’ innovativeness and their participation in stock markets. Existing research offers clues on how the capital structure of companies and decisions to go public relate to their innovativeness, but empirically it focuses almost exclusively on manufacturing. Such focus leaves a yawning research gap, considering that services account for two-­thirds to three-­quarters of employment in developed

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Donald A. Nichols

10. The global economy and manufacturing: the case of Wisconsin Donald A. Nichols* 1. INTRODUCTION This chapter illustrates and explores the situation facing a traditional manufacturing area looking to prosper in the modern global economy. Its focus is the state of Wisconsin in the US but, at least in its broad terms, the situation faced by that state is not unique in the world. Readers who are particularly concerned about other localities are likely to identify aspects of WisconsinÕs past, present and future mirrored and encountered elsewhere. I briefly sketch

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Audra I. Mockaitis

24 The path to the internationalization of Lithuanian manufacturing SMEs Audra I. Mockaitis Introduction Much has been written about the internationalization activities of multinational firms, and much attention in the literature has been given to the internationalization decisions of firms entering the Central and Eastern European (CEE) region. However, we still know relatively little about the internationalization activities of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), especially manufacturing SMEs in the CEE region. With the enlargement of the European Union

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Marilyn A. Brown and Gyungwon Kim

9.  Energy and manufacturing: technology and policy transformations and challenges Marilyn A. Brown and Gyungwon Kim 1. INTRODUCTION Energy is both a resource used in the production of goods and services and an industry in its own right, with its own raw materials and finished products. Just as energy inputs in manufacturing are evolving, so are energy industries modernizing and shifting. These transformations are motivated by global competition, resource constraints, and environmental concerns, but they are also enabled and impacted by public policies and by

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Ágnes Csermely, Péter Harasztosi and Gábor Pellényi

11. Opportunities and challenges – the impact of Chinese competition on Hungarian manufacturing Ágnes Csermely, Péter Harasztosi and Gábor Pellényi The rapid development of China is reshaping the dynamics of the global economy and has contributed to significant restructuring in both emerging and developed economies. As a result, traditional manufacturing exporting countries are facing a complex situation. Some companies and sectors can take advantage of new growth opportunities, while others are facing severe competitive threats. Gains arise in terms of

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Lucia Castellucci and Renato Giannetti

10. ‘Leaping frogs’ in the demography of manufacturing firms (1911–71)* Lucia Castellucci and Renato Giannetti INTRODUCTION 10.1 In business and economic history, there are basically two traditions of research on the dynamics of industrial firms. The first one emphasises the role of ‘clusters of technological innovations’ (henceforth CTI) which ‘punctuate’ the time arrow of economic history, as in Schumpeter (1939). According to this tradition, early in the history of an industry, when the technological cluster starts, uncertainty is very high while barriers