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United Nations Industrial Development Organization

Section 1.1 THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR Table 1.1 Industrialized countries Europe Year DISTRIBUTION OF WORLD MVA, 1995-2006 a/ Developing countries Regional groups South and East Asia West Asia and Europe Development groups Secondgeneration NICs Least developed countries CIS EU-15 EU-10 Other Japan North America Others Africa Latin America NICs China Others Percentage share in world total MVA (at constant 1995 prices) 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 b/ 2005 c/ 2006 c/ 1.9 1.7 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.1 2.4 2.6 28.9 28.0 27

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Makoto Hirano, Mitsuhiro Kurashige and Kiyonori Sakakibara

5. Yanagiya: one of the best-practice manufacturing SMEs in Japan* Makoto Hirano, Mitsuhiro Kurashige and Kiyonori Sakakibara 1. INTRODUCTION For many regional manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Japan, one pressing issue is how to survive in harder competition caused by globalization. Since the 1990s, Japan’s economy has faced serious stagnation caused by low-cost competition with emerging countries. According to the White Paper of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in 2014 by the Small and Medium Enterprise Agency of Japan, there are 3

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Sam Tavassoli, Babak Kianian and Tobias C. Larsson

11.  Manufacturing renaissance: return of manufacturing to western countries Sam Tavassoli, Babak Kianian and Tobias C. Larsson 1.  Introduction Twenty- ne percent of North American manufacturers reported bringo ing production back into or closer to North America during the second quarter of 2011 (surveyed by manufacturing sourcing website MFG.com in June 2011). More than one- hird of US- ased manufacturing executives t b at companies with sales greater than $1 billion are planning to bring back production to the USA from China or are considering it (BCG, 2012

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Marina van Geenhuizen and Qing Ye

4.  ‘Solar cities’ in China as leaders in photovoltaic manufacturing Marina van Geenhuizen and Qing Ye 1. INTRODUCTION Cities can contribute to socio-technical transitions in energy by acting as centres for the creation of new technologies and by serving as clusters of the (mass) manufacturing industries of the devices involved, such as solar cells (modules), wind turbines and fuel cells. They can also act as institutional innovators. China – through some of its cities – became the largest photovoltaic (PV) manufacturer in the world in the early 2000s and still

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Jiyoon Oh

6. Misallocation in the manufacturing sector of Korea: a micro data analysis Jiyoon Oh Korea’s GDP growth rate has been on a downward trajectory since the 1990s, elevating concerns over a slowdown in growth potential and economic dynamics. Korea’s GDP reached the 6 percent level in the 1990s, decreased to 4 percent in the 2000s and has maintained a level of around 3 percent since 2010. A country’s potential growth rate is contingent on increases in factor inputs and total factor productivity (TFP). In the Korean case, where the decline in factor inputs is

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Edgardo Sica

Firms, Finance and Sustainable Transitions 5.  Financial constraints and incremental eco-innovations: insights from manufacturing companies INTRODUCTION This chapter reports the results achieved from the implementation of a survey specifically designed to investigate the FC of eco-innovative companies at regime level. Specifically, it analyses the extent to which FC can prevent the creation of favourable conditions at regime level by hampering the development and/or adoption of incremental technological EIs and organisational EIs. The survey was

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Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

Industrial Policy for the Manufacturing Revolution 5.  A concrete experiment of industrial policy for the manufacturing revolution Previous chapters have reviewed industrial revolution and discussed to what extent a fourth industrial revolution is taking place. Implied structural changes for industry are substantial, as production organisation (products and processes) is changing and a new intermediary has taken growing importance, namely platforms, which have an impact on market competition. Regulatory and antitrust issues have been raised in the last

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Theoni Paschou, Federico Adrodegari, Marco Perona and Nicola Saccani

8 Digital servitization in manufacturing as a new stream of research: a review and a further research agenda Theoni Paschou, Federico Adrodegari, Marco Perona and Nicola Saccani Introduction The transition of manufacturing firms from products to services, generally referred as servitization, has been addressed by a growing amount of scientific literature in recent years. This transformation path has been analysed and described from diverse research streams, providing a variety of potentials for competition such as economical, organizational, customer

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Marcos Valdivia

13. Cultural and creative industries in Mexico: the role of export-oriented manufacturing metro areas Marcos Valdivia* 6 13.1 INTRODUCTION Cultural and creative industries (CCIs) have registered a secular growth during the last two decades in Mexico. Nowadays, these activities represent 3–6 per cent of the gross domestic product (GDP) for metropolitan areas (MAs) in Mexico. If compared with other leading or modern sectors such as the automotive (8 per cent), information and communication technology (ICT, 5 per cent) or pharmaceutical (1 per cent) industries

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Industrial Policy for the Manufacturing Revolution

Perspectives on Digital Globalisation

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

This book offers a critical reflection on the meaning and expected impact of the fourth industrial revolution, and its implications for industrial policy. Industrial revolutions are considered not only in terms of technological progress, but also in the context of the changing relationship between market and production dynamics, and the social and political conditions enabling the development of new technologies. Industrial Policy for the Manufacturing Revolution aims to increase our capacity to anticipate and adapt to the forthcoming structural changes. A concrete illustration of this industrial policy is provided through an experience of its implementation at regional level.