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Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

Industrial Policy for the Manufacturing Revolution 1.  Introduction: globalisation and the manufacturing revolution The twenty-first century is becoming an era of profound societal and economic change. Globalisation has reduced its pace after the financial crisis, at least in terms of global trade of physical goods and services. However, industries are pursuing the structural changes implied by the rising extent of the market brought about by globalisation. Firms sell in global markets and ally with competitors to realise the R&D of specific product

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Samuel Laird and Ramiro Guzman

3. Trade controls in manufacturing trade Samuel Laird and Ramiro Guzmanl I. INTRODUCTION There have been major changes in the manner and product coverage of trade protection measures used in the Western hemisphere in recent years. The changes reflect a movement from inward-oriented, import substitution policies to outward-oriented policies that give much greater play to market forces. The process of change continues because the fu ll effects of the changes that have already taken place with regard to trade policies have not yet fully worked their way through

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François Gipouloux

13. The East Asian manufacturing belt During the 1990s, the impact of inter-Asian trade was felt across China’s coastal provinces. These areas became integrated into a network of international subcontracting, abundantly irrigated by streams of foreign capital.1 Capital flows, technology and human interaction were focused on the great hubs that served as anchorage points: Hong Kong, Shanghai, Peking and, soon perhaps, Tientsin. As we have seen in the previous chapter Chinese cities, by the very nature of their history, have nevertheless undergone a different

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UNIDO

THE MANUFACTURING DIVISIONS Section 1.2 Table 1.5 (Percentage) Industrialized Economies Europe b/ DISTRIBUTION OF WORLD VALUE ADDED, SELECTED DIVISIONS AND YEARS Developing & Emerging Industrial Economies a/ ISIC Division 66.3 60.2 55.0 62.6 55.5 51.7 52.2 38.2 30.1 49.2 33.7 28.3 45.5 31.6 24.1 48.8 36.3 31.5 77.1 69.5 64.4 74.3 65.6 60.3 84.8 79.4 74.6 54.0 50.6 50.8 8.9 7.2 6.3 8.6 9.4 10.2 10.0 9.0 8.5 27.8 26.2 23.2 4.2 4.1 3.9 19.0 21.5 19.9 21.7 20.9 18.7 2.1 2.2 2.2 14.1 12.6 11.7 0.1 0.1 0.2 1.1 1.2 1.6 1.8 2.3 2.8 29.1 28.3 23.8 5.3 6.2 5.6 10.2 9

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UNIDO

THE MANUFACTURING DIVISIONS Section 1.2 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 2005 2010 2015 10 Food products 11 Beverages 12 Tobacco products 13 Textiles 14 Wearing apparel 15 Leather and related products 16 Wood products, excluding furniture 17 Paper and paper products 18 Printing and reproduction of recorded media 19 Coke and refined petroleum products a/ At constant 2010 prices. b/ Excluding non-industrialized EU economies. c/ Including China

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UNIDO

THE MANUFACTURING DIVISIONS Section 1.2 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 2005 2010 2016 10 Food products 11 Beverages 12 Tobacco products 13 Textiles 14 Wearing apparel 15 Leather and related products 16 Wood products, excluding furniture 17 Paper and paper products 18 Printing and reproduction of recorded media 19 Coke and refined petroleum products a/ At constant 2010 prices. b/ Excluding non-industrialized EU economies. c/ Including China

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UNIDO

THE MANUFACTURING DIVISIONS Section 1.2 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 2005 2010 2017 10 Food products 11 Beverages 12 Tobacco products 13 Textiles 14 Wearing apparel 15 Leather and related products 16 Wood products, excluding furniture 17 Paper and paper products 18 Printing and reproduction of recorded media 19 Coke and refined petroleum products a/ At constant 2010 prices. b/ Excluding non-industrialized EU economies. c/ Including China

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Annex: Attracting Manufacturing FDI to Africa

Technology Development and Technology Systems in Africa

Sanjaya Lall and Carlo Pietrobelli

3615_Failing2Compete/Annex 16/9/02 12:05 pm Page 1 Annex: Attracting manufacturing FDI to Africa In common with other developing regions, Africa is actively seeking FDI in particular export-oriented manufacturing FDI - to build industrial competitiveness and enhance economic growth. Most African countries have improved their FDI regimes in recent years. They have removed most restrictions on foreign entry and participation. Many are privatizing stateowned enterprises and utilities, and welcoming foreign investors to participate. Several have launched

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UNIDO

Section 1.1 THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR Major trends of growth and distribution of manufacturing in the world - 35 - Figure 1: Growth of MVA in industrialized regions, at constant 2000 USD (1994=100) Figure 2: Share of industrialized and developing countries as a per cent of world MVA, at constant 2000 USD The effect of the recent financial crisis on economic growth of developing countries has been relatively mild. As a result, the share of developing countries in the world MVA has continued to rise. The ratio of MVA of industrialized to developing countries has

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Jan Youtie and Philip Shapira

4. Innovation strategies and manufacturing practices: insights from the 2005 Georgia Manufacturing Survey Jan Youtie and Philip Shapira INTRODUCTION In a globalized market environment, the competitiveness of manufacturing, which we understand as the ability to make and sell products while maintaining or increasing real income, is influenced by many factors, including the growth of productivity and the exchange rate. This chapter focuses on the role and extent of innovation as a basis for sustaining manufacturing competitiveness. It was Schumpeter (1934) who