You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items :

  • natural rate of interest x
  • Competition Policy x
  • Economics 2013 x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Gas supply: the role of liquefied natural gas

Regulation, Supply and Demand

Sophia Ruester

3. Gas supply: the role of liquefied natural gas Sophia Ruester 1  Introduction During the last decade, the LNG industry altered substantially. Traded volumes increased by an annual average of 7 per cent from 2000 on. New players entered the market and new trading patterns evolved. On the one hand, vertical and horizontal integration have become more common, with traditional oil and gas majors investing in a portfolio of LNG export, transport and import capacities, which enables flexible trades. On the other, new business models of non-­integration emerged. Long

You do not have access to this content

Building Competitive Gas Markets in the EU

Regulation, Supply and Demand

Jean-Michel Glachant, Michelle Hallack and Miguel Vazquez

This highly unique book focuses on market design issues common to most EU gas markets, particularly in the context of closer integration. It explores in detail the characteristics and requirements of national gas markets in Europe which are constructed as virtual hubs based on entry/exit schemes as a requirement of European law.
You do not have access to this content

An American model for the EU gas market?

Regulation, Supply and Demand

Sergio Ascari

8. An American model for the EU gas market? Sergio Ascari 1 Introduction – Why an American Model? What American Model? Despite the MECO-­S model advocated by Jean-­Michel Glachant in Chapter 7 ‘A vision for the EU gas target model: MECO-­S’, the most natural reference for a target model for the European market is the North American model. Unlike any other theoretical model that may be proposed, this is a working model that has been developed as the result of a long historical process, and is widely regarded as a success story. It has delivered secure supplies at

You do not have access to this content

A vision for the EU gas target model: MECO-S

Regulation, Supply and Demand

Jean-Michel Glachant

this a lesser problem because on the one hand exchanges should have a natural interest in participating in market coupling because it can further their business and on the other hand, exchanges are (although subject to network economics) not natural monopolies. So if the dominant exchange for a market does not want to cooperate on a voluntary basis, maybe another one will or even TSOs might take over that task. The following subsection deals with the first issue of supporting and not preventing the model in the Framework Guidelines. It lists – per Framework Guideline