You are looking at 1 - 10 of 270 items :

  • natural rate of interest x
  • Strategic Management x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Alain Verbeke, Robert Schulz, Nathan Greidanus and Laura Hambley

-intensive, while others are more human-resource-intensive. Societies with human-resource-intensive industry concentrations (for example, high technology) will probably have higher telework adoption rates than those with more capital-intensive industries (for example, natural resource-based industries). The above examples are provided as an illustration of the potential societal structures that may influence the variation of telework adoption rates across societies. As suggested throughout this book, however, the biggest influences on societal adoption rates are likely to be

You do not have access to this content

J. Richard Harrison and Gordon Walker

realistic mortality rates for a firm. Once the time period is determined, the number of time periods to be simulated can be set to obtain the desired total M2904 - DAGNINO PRINT.indd 416 28/05/2012 15:42 Computer simulation modeling in competitive strategy research 417 duration of the simulation run, or a rule may be established to stop the run once certain conditions (e.g. system equilibrium) are met. The outcomes of interest are often some function of the behavior of the system, and need to be calculated from system variables. Outcomes may be calculated for each time

You do not have access to this content

Stelios C. Zyglidopoulos and Stephanie W.J.C. Schreven

will be faced. An organization that succeeds in approximating the coordinates of the territory well enough creates a strategic position, the reward of which will be reflected in its performance. But the rate and kind of change that organizations have to deal with is not always the same. Therefore, if we are to investigate the impact that organizational memory has on strategic foresight, we must clarify what kind of change the organization is up against. In the following subsection we present the punctuated equilibrium theory (Tushman and Romanelli 1985; Gersick 1991

You do not have access to this content

Rebecca Piekkari, Denice E. Welch and Lawrence S. Welch

the question as intended. In each of these situations, the researcher is dependent on the quality of the translation. Answers may thus be compromised. Another consideration that is virtually ignored is the potential effect of language on the response rate and the pattern of responses. Harzing’s (1997) research on the issue of international mail survey response rates is one of the few that considers the possible influence of cultural aspects, including language. Her focus was on the then dominance of US- ased b research with its English language bias. She found that

You do not have access to this content

Rajneesh Narula and Grazia D. Santangelo

governments that seek to restrict (or encourage) the activities of a particular group of actors by introducing barriers to their use of certain L advantages. These may be for commercial reasons, or for strategic reasons such as national defence, or reflect the influence of interest groups who are able to influence government policy. These represent a subset of the ‘liability of foreignness’, when L advantages are available to local and foreign firms at differential costs (Zaheer, 1995). Note that when location-bound assets are in the private domain (i.e. they are

You do not have access to this content

P. Devereaux Jennings, Paul A. Zandbergen and Martin L. Martens

positive effects on enforcement rates (Models 1–3). In fact, media attention is negatively related to referrals and charges. Why? In part, because the media’s attention tends to peak only occasionally, meaning most rates are not related to monthly variations in rates. In addition, in our sample, this peak came mid-way through the regulatory period. As referrals, charges, and penalties gradually increased in the latter years, it meant the decline in interest was negatively related, on average, to these enforcement rates. Clearly, emergence of an identifiable policy became

You do not have access to this content

Ulf Andersson and Philip Kappen

technology brings (Zander and Kogut 1995). In line with this reasoning, the performance dimension of special interest to technology projects for this chapter is the speed of development to transfer initiation, that is the time it takes for a project to be developed and the transfer initiated. A reason for headquarters to engage in the development process is the possibility to create additional value protected from the external markets and the ability for the headquarters to choose the most promising projects to support and further increase profits in the MNC (Stein 1997

This content is available to you

Robert Bradley Mackay and Laura A Costanzo

, while relatively accurate in the short term, in the medium to long term as political, economic, social, technological, natural and legal trends interact in unpredictable and novel ways, forecasting accuracy begins to diminish as environmental complexity and uncertainty increase. Endogenous and exogenous factors having deleterious influences on forecasting accuracy can stem from illusions of control (Durand 2003), changing patterns over time, the actions of people influencing future events, a new technological innovation or the failure of an existing one, sudden global

You do not have access to this content

Alain Verbeke, Robert Schulz, Nathan Greidanus and Laura Hambley

significantly more positive in their attitudes about working than non-teleworkers (Wirthlin Worldwide, 1999). Further, teleworkers rated their company more positively than non-teleworkers on almost all corporate performance attributes. Satisfied teleworkers have been found to demonstrate increased productivity and teamwork (Manoochehri and Pinkerton, 2003). Thus, telework can lead employees to be more positive and satisfied, and hence more committed to excellence in their jobs. From the organization’s perspective, this increased commitment to excellence is a positive impact of

You do not have access to this content

Philippe Baumard

4. Learning in coopetitive environments Philippe Baumard INTRODUCTION Coopetitive environments (Brandenburger and Nalebuff, 1996) are characterized by situations where firms simultaneously compete and cooperate with competitors. Such situations impede the generation of proprietary and discretionary learning, by forcing competitors to selectively share critical knowledge about their assets (Baumard, 2008). Coopetition can arise from partial or incomplete interest in a rival’s domain, where it does not require a full entry or deployment into it. Dagnino and