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Dic Lo and Yu Zhang

7. Centrally planned economy Dic Lo and Yu Zhang The notion of ‘centrally planned economy’ has been, almost universally, accepted as synonymous with the Soviet-type economic system that had collapsed by the 1990s. Its potential – in terms of desirability and feasibility – has thus been associated with the historical experience of achievements and shortcomings of the Soviet and similar economies. In addition, to a lesser extent and more in popular imagination, (Soviet) central planning has been associated with Marxism or a Marxist regime itself at the expense of

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Zenon X. Zygmont

JOBNAME: Mixon & Cebula PAGE: 1 SESS: 3 OUTPUT: Fri Feb 21 15:24:00 2014 8. Using literature to teach the economics of the Soviet-type and centrally planned economies Zenon X. Zygmont* 8.1 INTRODUCTION The recent anthology by Watts (2003) shows the wealth of examples available for instructors who choose to integrate literature in their economics courses. However, as Watts (2003) acknowledges, the examples consist mainly of the contributions by American and British writers (Watts, 2003, p. xvi). This chapter extends the range of literary examples by concentrating

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Jens Andvig

10 Corruption in China and Russia compared: different legacies of central planning Jens Andvig Corruption is a central issue for countries making a transition from centrally planned to capitalist market economies. The population in most European former socialist countries and in the former Soviet Union perceived that the transition from central planning was accompanied by a large increase in corruption.1 China and Vietnam apparently also went through a period early in their transition when corruption was perceived to increase dramatically.2 Why this increase in

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Raymond Markey

17 Labour Issues in the Former Centrally Planned Economies in Eastern Europe Raymond Markey University of Wollongong The former centrally planned economies of Central and Eastern Europe have faced major changes in labour relations as part of their transformation towards market-based economies. The manner in which these issues have been addressed has been mediated by variations in the nature of the transformation of the state, the historical diversity of the forms of regulation of labour relations under prior communist regimes, and differences in the process

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Juliet Johnson

6.  The Bank of Russia: from central planning to inflation targeting1 Juliet Johnson Russians describe the 1990s with the telling word bespredel—without limits. Fortunes were made and lost, corruption and criminality ran rife, uncertainty reigned, and indeed, everything and anything seemed possible. These years saw the rise of the so-called oligarchs, the band of commercial bankers who loomed so large over the political  system  that  ­prominent  academics and policy makers spoke of Russia as a captured state. Both wealth and political power became concentrated

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Charles Harvie

18 The Transition of Centrally Planned Economies in East Asia into Market Economies Charles Harvie University of Wollongong The pri.mary objectives of this chapter are: firstly. to conduct a comparative analysis of the transition process to market·oriented economies for China and Vietnam, identifying and contrasting the major reform measures adopted in both; secondly, to conduct a comparative analysis, and appraisal, of the performance of these economies with regard to developments in key macroeconomic variables during their respective transition periods; and

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Erika Kovács, Nikita Lyutov and Leszek Mitrus

JOBNAME: Finkin PAGE: 1 SESS: 5 OUTPUT: Thu Jun 25 15:23:46 2015 13. Labor law in transition: From a centrally planned to a free market economy in Central and Eastern Europe Erika Kovács, Nikita Lyutov and Leszek Mitrus INTRODUCTION This chapter covers the specifics of countries in Eastern Europe,1 all of which had been governed by a socialist political system some 20 years ago.2 A whole generation has grown up since the time of the socialists. However, the labor law systems of these countries were so much affected by the socialist political structure, that

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Steven Shultz

2. Integrating socioeconomic and biophysical data with a GIS to plan sustainable resource management efforts in Central America Steven Shultz INTRODUCTION Sustainable resource management efforts in Central America and in many other tropical regions of the world are often focused on the watershed level of analysis and commonly promote soil conservation, agroforestry and reforestation techniques among small hillside farmers (Lutz et al., 1995; Current et al., 1995). Regularly needed information for planning and implementing such activities includes the

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Charles Harvie

16 The Transition of the Centrally Planned Economies in Eastern Europe to Market Economies: the Cases of the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland Charles Harvie University of Wollongong This chapter is primarily concerned with identifying, analysing and explaining the recent macroeconomic performance of three Central European economies - the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland, which have been amongst the leading and most successful of the formerly centrally planned economies currently involved in the transition process to market-oriented economies. The key reform

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Accessibility Analysis and Transport Planning

Challenges for Europe and North America

Edited by Karst T. Geurs, Kevin J. Krizek and Aura Reggiani

Accessibility is a concept central to integrated transport and land use planning. The goal of improving accessibility for all modes, for all people, has made its way into mainstream transport policy and planning in communities worldwide. This unique and fascinating book introduces new accessibility approaches to transport planning across Europe and the United States.