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Paul James

23 Culture Paul James INTRODUCTION What is the relationship between culture, globalisation, and development? This apparently simple question leads us down an extraordinary pathway. If culture signifies the domain of social meaning that grounds human existence, if globalisation refers to the process of extending social relations across world space, and further, if development names the nature of social change across time as it affects different human cohorts and communities, then this triangle of concepts – culture, globalisation, and development – should be

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Elisa J. Sobo

21.  Culture and medical travel Elisa J. Sobo 21.1 INTRODUCTION By definition, medical travel entails cross-­cultural encounters. This chapter takes a detailed look at the culture concept, and then examines the various ways in which culture informs diverse dimensions of medical travel, including not only marketing, facilitation, and health services delivery, but also care seeking itself. As will be shown, although ‘cultural competence’ in clinical encounters is important, culture influences much more than patients’ dietary norms, greeting traditions, and modes

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Barbara Czarniawska and Bernward Joerges

3. Robotization and popular culture No wonder the topic of robotization and such related themes as space travel constantly return to popular culture. And as popular culture both reflects and shapes social life – including work organization and management – it would be instructive to follow changes in the representation of robots and robotization over time. Robotization can revolutionize labor markets; in particular, according to current debates, robots can replace immigrants in menial jobs. Or robotization can occur as a stepwise transformation with complex

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Tore Hillestad

19. Developing innovative organizational culture Tore Hillestad 19.1 INTRODUCTION Recent research suggests that organizations should develop innovative and adaptable cultures to gain and sustain competitive advantages (Chatman et al., 2014). Further, it has been noted that such innovative and adaptable cultural attributes may especially benefit service providers and promote innovation, but they also imply a radical cultural shift: that effective competing through service involves the entire organization viewing and approaching both itself and the market based on

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Barbara Czarniawska and Bernward Joerges

4. Robots in popular culture In choosing works of popular culture that present robots, we used a simplified definition of the term, yet one applied by robotics scientists, permitting us to place some limits on an extremely vast material. Robots, as mentioned in Chapter 2, have physical bodies endowed with sensors for collecting information about the outside world and activators to permit changes. Artificial Intelligence is the advanced software that permits robots to fulfill their tasks by processing large amounts of information collected by robot's sensory

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Edited by Laura E. Grube and Virgil Henry Storr

This edited volume, a collection of both theoretical essays and empirical studies, presents an Austrian economics perspective on the role of culture in economic action. The authors illustrate that culture cannot be separated from economic action, but that it is in fact part of all decision-making.
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Jonathan Ward and Phil Hubbard

13.  Urban regeneration through culture Jonathan Ward and Phil Hubbard 13.1 INTRODUCTION As a subset of more general urban and planning policy, urban regeneration policy has become more significant in recent decades, especially in those ‘shrinking cities’ that have borne the brunt of global shifts and economic transitions. Foremost here have been some of the former economic powerhouses of the industrial economy, with Detroit, Liverpool and Leipzig frequently cited as paradigmatic examples of cities whose economic base has been undermined by the emergence of a

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Alistair Cheyne

The importance of the concept of culture for organizations stems from the notion that it provides a dynamic and interactive model of organizing and can help explain how organizational environments might be characterized, assessed and ultimately controlled (Deal and Kennedy, 1982 ). An important aspect here is the longstanding belief that successful organizations have a strong or positive corporate culture (Deal and Kennedy, 1982 ; Peters and Waterman, 1982 ), and that an understanding of culture can provide a way of explaining how and why particular

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David Nelken

39 Legal culture* 1 David Nelken The term ‘legal culture’ can be used in a variety of ways (Merry, 2012). Some of these are somewhat ill-defined, as when it is used as a rough equivalent to ‘legal system’ (Varga, 1992; Gessner, Hoeland and Varga, 1996; Bell, 2002); others are over-defined, as when it is limited to the techniques of exposition and interpretation employed by jurists and other legal actors (Rebuffa and Blankenburg, 1993). Those interested in the relationship between law and culture may wish to study law as a cultural artefact (Kahn, 1999

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David Nelken

34 Legal culture* David Nelken The term ‘legal culture’ can be used in a variety of ways. Some of these are somewhat ill-defined, as when it is used as a rough equivalent to ‘legal system’ (Varga, 1992; Gessner, Hoeland and Varga, 1996; Bell, 2002); others are over-defined, as when it is limited to the techniques of exposition and interpretation employed by jurists and other legal actors (Rebuffa and Blankenburg, 1993). Those interested in the relationship between law and culture may wish to study law as a cultural artefact (Kahn, 1999), examine the way it becomes