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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Teaching Leadership 3.  Developing a leadership curriculum The wide variety of disciplines incorporating leadership components into their curricula seem to suggest that leadership studies is inherently an interdisciplinary enterprise, as discussed in the previous chapter. However, the study of leadership has become increasingly sophisticated, to the point that it has developed its own canon and its own academic niche in higher education. In this chapter, we explore this intellectual development as a way to suggest different paths that educators may take

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Carol Dalglish and Peter Evans

M1394 - DALGLISH TEXT.qxd 15/7/08 15:23 Page 69 Gary Graham:GRAHAM'S IMAC JOBS: GRAYUMS G4 6. Curriculum design As things are . . . mankind are by no means agreed about the things to be taught . . . and again about the means there is no agreement. Aristotle INTRODUCTION Curriculum seems to have had a long past but a short history. It has been pondered in the minds of philosophers and teachers over the centuries yet only received definition in the nineteenth century, according to The Oxford English Dictionary. And as with most fields of endeavour, definitions

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Birton J. Cowden

19.  Venture execution: the missing curriculum puzzle piece Birton J. Cowden INTRODUCTION When building our entrepreneurship curriculum, students had a variety of courses that focused on building the entrepreneurial mindset. For those that already “drank the Kool-Aid,” we wanted to offer courses that got them closer to launch. The natural progression was to implement a Lean Launchpad course (Blank & Dorf, 2012). After a few iterations, a number of the ventures that went through that class became viable and real. It was at this point that our customers, the

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Ash Parton and Martin Haigh

20.  Enhancing internationalisation in the geography undergraduate curriculum Ash Parton and Martin Haigh INTRODUCTION Internationalisation of the curriculum has three dimensions: international, global and intercultural (Knight, 2003). This chapter describes some pedagogic strategies that may help foster the development of international, global and intercultural thinking in geography undergraduates and considers the question: ‘what does internationalisation of the curriculum really mean for my teaching?’ (Jones and Killick, 2013). It outlines two contrasting

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Ara Pachmayer, Kathleen Andereck and Rebekka Goodman

23  Internationalizing the tourism curriculum via study abroad Ara Pachmayer, Kathleen Andereck and Rebekka Goodman 1. INTRODUCTION Study abroad has been cited as a way to internationalize the curriculum. While some studies suggest that study abroad is not more effective in internationalizing curricula than other options (Soria and Troisi, 2013; Vance et al., 2011), much past research shows that study abroad can be used as a tool to successfully internationalize the curriculum and help to produce globally aware graduates (Coelho, 1962; Domask, 2007; Douglas and

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Michael H. Morris, Donald F. Kuratko and Jeffrey R. Cornwall

4.  Establishing the core curriculum Introduction If entrepreneurship is approached as an academic discipline, what is its content? What should be taught in entrepreneurship courses, and what kinds of courses should be included in an entrepreneurship curriculum?  How important is it to teach students how to start a business versus how to think and act in entrepreneurial ways? These are questions  with  answers for which no real standards exist. They are questions  with which deans, faculty members, curriculum committees, advisory boards, students, donors and

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Ruth Bridgstock

7 Creative industries and higher education: what curriculum, what evidence, what impact? Ruth Bridgstock Introduction It has been twenty years since the publication of the initial creative industries mapping documents which made an explicit link between disciplinary creative practice1 and economic growth. This link began with an emphasis on the impact of creative sectors and industries, but over time also became about the creative workers within them. Policy makers and scholars argued that the application of creative human capital, in the context of an

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Mitch Goodwin, Kay Are, Michael 'Maxx' Schmitz, Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins, Wajeehah Aayeshah and Elizabeth Lakey

9. The capstone experience: five principles for a connected curriculum Mitch Goodwin, Kay Are, Michael ‘Maxx’ Schmitz, Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins, Wajeehah Aayeshah and Elizabeth Lakey POSITIONING THE CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE As it is presented in the international literature, ‘capstone’ is the name commonly given to final-year units of study designed, on the one hand, to consolidate learning gained throughout a course of study and, on the other, to orient students towards life beyond tertiary study (Leahy et al., 2017). The existing scholarship suggests three main

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Andrea Boyle

26  Integrating sustainability in the tourism curriculum: dilemmas and directions Andrea Boyle 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1  Defining Sustainability Sustainability can be viewed as an ideological debate with multiple meanings (Davidson, 2014). It appears difficult to reconcile as it is dependent on the paradigmatic vantage point of whoever defines it. Conceptualizations range from a ‘strong’ perspective, concerned with the natural environment and its biophysical systems (biocentric, deep or dark green), towards a ‘weak’ viewpoint (anthropocentric, pale green

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Lisa Mol, Michael Horswell and Lucy Clarke

26.  Fieldwork in the undergraduate geography curriculum: developing graduate skills Lisa Mol, Michael Horswell and Lucy Clarke INTRODUCTION The role of fieldwork in student learning and development has been extensively discussed in academic literature, in particular focussing on geography degrees where fieldwork assumes a prominent place in the curriculum (Fuller et al., 2000). As Walkington et al. (2011) argue, the exposure of students to new environments and on-site learning methods can greatly enhance intellectual development throughout the degree course