You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,074 items :

  • household air pollution x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Benjamin Mason Meier, Ipsita Das and Pamela Jagger

1 INTRODUCTION While household energy has historically been the purview of the energy and natural resource management communities, the 2016 release of the World Health Organization's (WHO's) report, Burning Opportunity: Clean Household Energy for Health, Sustainable Development, and Wellbeing of Women and Children , 1 provides an opportunity to assess the potential for public health policy to mitigate the health risks associated with exposure to household air pollution (HAP). Despite overwhelming scientific consensus on the health burden of exposure to HAP

You do not have access to this content

Aaron Golub and Aaron Johnson

traveler can suffer from long delays, which negatively affects family life and social relations. At a value of $10 per hour, these delays are estimated to cost between $63 and $246 billion per year (Delucchi and McCubbin 2010). Local Air Pollution In the US environmental legislation like the Clean Air Act, enacted in 1970, has reduced tailpipe pollution emissions by around 99% for most pollutants. However, large increases in driving mean that local air pollution remains a national problem. More than 120 million Americans live in counties that fail at least one of the

You do not have access to this content

Ian Parry, Baoping Shang, Nate Vernon, Philippe Wingender and Tarun Narasimhan

:05 Evaluating policies to implement the Paris Agreement  33 of specific policies, and to communicate the case for policy actions to legislators and stakeholders, policymakers need an overarching quantitative framework for comparing options against a wide range of metrics including their effects on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, revenue, premature deaths from local air pollution, incidence across household and industry groups, as well as their overall domestic economic benefits and costs. While there has been plenty of valuable modelling of specific carbon mitigation policies

This content is available to you

Edited by Anil Markandya and Nick Dale

Depletion indicators 21.1 Percentage of pan-European threatened species in one country 21A1.1 Cost of resource depletion and air pollution damage in the EU 21A1.2 Cost of resource depletion and air pollution damage expressed as percentage of GNP 25.1 Classification of heavy metals 25.2 Toxicity ranking system based on log H and LC50 25.3 Activities causing potential harm 30.1 Domestic waste from households, small enterprises and commercial services in the former West Germany 32.1 Main European water directives 34.1 Water use in France and Spain 3.1 19 59 103 120 153 154

You do not have access to this content

Arik Levinson

poses a problem mostly downwind of coal-fired power plants. Neither explanation seems implausible on its own, but combined they start to sound like ex post rationalizations of potentially spurious results. 9.3.4  Panels Ideally, to solve the three problems of omitted variables, selection, and habituation, we would have panel data on the same individuals surveyed at different times and experiencing different air pollution. Three recent papers use panel data. Giovanis and Ozdamar (2016) use the Swiss Household Panel Survey (SHPS) from 2000 to 2013 to estimate a version

You do not have access to this content

Yu Wenxuan and Chen Shiyin

living organisms, or cause damage to the natural environment or built environment, into the atmosphere’.1 Air pollution is among the most urgent problems in China. Air pollution is caused by both natural phenomena and human activities. In the modern age the main sources of air pollution are human activities. These activities mainly include: (1) household pollutants, including those produced during cooking, heating, bathing, etc.; (2) industrial pollutants, from industrial production, especially the soot, dust, organic and inorganic compound discharged from heat power

You do not have access to this content

Arik Levinson

, 1998), automobile emissions (Kahn, 1998), toxic waste (Wang et al., 1998; Millimet and Stengos, 1999; Arora and Cason, 1999), and indoor air pollution (Chaudhuri and Pfaff, 1998). This last is notable because indoor air pollution is arguably entirely internalized. If households make rational, fully-informed decisions, then there are no market failures associated with indoor air pollution, and the 122 Recent advances in environmental economics Chaudhuri and Pfaff result suggests that an inverse-U-shaped pollution–income path is consistent with Pareto-optimality. None

You do not have access to this content

Kenny Ho and David Maddison

brings an indirect benefit by improving ambient air quality. Our main focus in this chapter is to evaluate the impact of the London Congestion Charging Scheme (LCCS) on the ambient air quality in the capital. Motor vehicle emissions contribute to five major pollutants: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter (PM10). We use the concentration of PM10 as our air pollution index because clinically it is one of the most important pollutants in vehicle exhaust emissions. Many researchers have linked it

You do not have access to this content

Kendro Pedrosa and Bernard Vanheusden

. First, there are the health-related problems. Some diseases caused by air pollution include stroke, heart disease, lung cancer, chronic and cardiovascular diseases, including acute respiratory diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.14 The WHO estimates that globally, 7 million premature deaths in 2012 could be attributed to household and ambient air pollution. This corresponds to one in eight of total global deaths, making it the biggest environmental health risk.15 In the European Union (EU) in particular, more than 400,000 premature deaths

You do not have access to this content

Xin Zhang, Xi Chen and Xiaobo Zhang

during the more than four months survey in most counties.10 10.4  RESULTS 10.4.1  Baseline Results We report the baseline results of air pollution on various SWB measures in Table 10.2 through Table 10.4. In each table, columns (1) through (6) estimate equation (10.1) respectively using PM2.5, PM10, CO, NO2, O3 and SO2 as the air pollution measures. Table 10.2 presents the baseline results on life satisfaction. Column (1) begins with PM2.5. We do not find any significant relationship between PM2.5 and life satisfaction. Household per capita income is positively