You are looking at 1 - 10 of 44,581 items :

Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Edited by Heinz D. Kurz and Neri Salvadori

Marshall, A. (1946), Principles of Economics, London: Macmillan. Ricardo, D. (1951-73), The Works and Correspondence of David Ricardo, 11 vols, ed. P. Sraffa, with the collaboration of M.H. Dobb, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; referred to in the text as Works. Smith, A. (1976), An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 1st edn 1776; Vol. I1 of The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence o Adam Smith, f ed. R.H. Campbell, AS. Skinner and W.B. Todd, Oxford: Oxford University Press; referred to in the text as WN. Sraffa, P. (1960

You do not have access to this content

David Pearce, Kirk Hamilton and Giles Atkinson

9. Valuing nature David Pearce, Kirk Hamilton and Giles Atkinson 1 INTRODUCTION Roefie Hueting’s New Scarcity and Economic Growth (Hueting, 1980) has a deserved place in the history of environmental economics. Roefie warned that slavish adherence to gross national product (GNP) as an indicator of human well-being was totally misleading because of its exclusion of so many of the factors that contribute to that well-being, not least the quality of the services provided to us by the natural environment. While this observation is today a commonplace, we often risk

You do not have access to this content

Dennis R. Young

Financing Nonprofits and Other Social Enterprises 4.  The nature of benefits and their financing INTRODUCTION Chapter 3 made a general distinction between public and private benefits produced by social purpose organizations. This chapter further differentiates within and between these broad categories in order to account for the myriad combinations of SPO finance. In brief, it is argued that the better that an SPO understands the nature of the benefits it provides, the more successful it can be in generating the necessary economic resources to

You do not have access to this content

William E. Rees

22  Going down? Human nature, growth and (un)sustainability William E. Rees SETTING THE STAGE: THE NATURE AND NURTURE OF UNSUSTAINABILITY This chapter starts from the premise that the scale of the human enterprise is already excessive – our best science shows that we are in a state of ecological ‘overshoot’. Resource consumption and waste production exceed the regenerative and assimilative capacities of nature and both are still trending upward. The purpose of the analysis is to make the case that this situation is, in fundamental ways, ‘natural’. Techno

You do not have access to this content

R. Quentin Grafton, Harry W. Nelson, N. Ross Lambie and Paul R. Wyrwoll

Tourism that has, as its main attraction, access to nature. Nature tourism differs from ecotourism in that nature tourism does not necessarily meet criteria designed to ensure low environmental impacts.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Philipp H. Pattberg and Fariborz Zelli

Definitions The social critic Raymond Williams famously remarked that ‘nature’ is one of the most contested words in the English language. So many people use it in so many ways that it is hard to nail down. This should come as no surprise to students of global environmental politics and governance, since nature’s place in the discipline and in global environmental affairs in general is a changing, uncertain one. While much environmental concern revolves around nature, people have held and continue to hold different understandings of the term across time and

You do not have access to this content

Jennifer Howard-Grenville

3. Nature and culture Any given environment we know . . . exists as a structure of meaningful distinctions. (Douglas, 1972: 139) Members of any culture, including organizational cultures, hold particular and partial views of the natural environment and appropriate actions toward it. Broad trends, such as those outlined in the previous chapter, can capture and bound the scope and character of a company’s interactions with the environment, but the details of such interactions also depend on how the company’s members perceive the issues, label them as problems

You do not have access to this content

Filippo Valguarnera

JOBNAME: Graziadei & Smith PAGE: 1 SESS: 3 OUTPUT: Tue Dec 20 10:52:53 2016 11. Access to nature Filippo Valguarnera 1. INTRODUCTION In 1979, the United States Supreme Court declared that the right to exclude others is ‘one of the most essential sticks in the bundle of rights that are commonly characterized as property’.1 While the sticks metaphor is quintessentially common law, the main point of the statement – the centrality of the right to exclude for the notion of property – is, arguably, common to many Western legal traditions. This notion is implicitly

You do not have access to this content

James McGlade and Elizabeth Garnsey

1. The nature of complexity James McGlade and Elizabeth Garnsey BACKGROUND Over the past decades, theories of chaos, complexity and the idea of a new non-linear science have become increasingly prominent in leading edge research in the physical and biological sciences, and have diffused into the social sciences. Complexity driven research is currently engaging physicists, biologists, ecologists, geographers and sociologists alike, supported by a rapid growth of specialist academic journals and popular science books (see Edmonds 1996; McGlade and van der Leeuw

You do not have access to this content

Eli P. Fenichel, Sathya Gopalakrishnan and Onon Bayasgalan

7.  Bioeconomics: nature as capital Eli P. Fenichel, Sathya Gopalakrishnan and Onon Bayasgalan 7.1  BIOECONOMICS: NATURE AS CAPITAL The idea that ecosystems generate value is foundational in environmental and resource economics (Brown 2000; Freeman 2003). The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) placed the issue of valuing nature at the forefront of many interdisciplinary policy discussions (Daily et al. 2000; Worm et al. 2006; Daily et al. 2009; Polasky and Segerson 2009), and the importance of considering the value of ecosystems is now pervasive and