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Geert Van Calster and Leonie Reins

EU Environmental Law 10.  Biodiversity and nature conservation Risks to natural resources, that is, biodiversity loss and degradation, have been an intense focus of the EU for quite some time. In the Commission’s 2001 Sustainable Development Study, 1 it was recognised that biodiversity loss in the EU was one of the biggest environmental challenges 2 threatening the “future well-being of European society”. 3 Further, in the EU biodiversity strategy for the period up to 2020, 4 the EU, having failed to attain the 2010 goal, aims at “reversing

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Maano Ramutsindela and Christine Noe

JOBNAME: Bryant PAGE: 1 SESS: 4 OUTPUT: Tue Jul 28 13:37:25 2015 36. Bordering and scalar thickening in nature conservation Maano Ramutsindela and Christine Noe The links between political ecology and scalar analyses are now firmly established, with widespread agreement among social scientists on the view that ecological scaling shapes political-economic dynamics. It is also acknowleged that scale is integral to ‘political ecologists’ analyses of human–environment relations’ (Neumann, 2009: 398). Using the concept of scale in political ecology permits the

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Sophie Riley

jurisprudence and compassionate conservation. 19 It is concluded that society needs a fresh approach where humans take responsibility for their ‘redecoration’ of nature by designing and implementing holistic regimes that are consistent with principles drawn and synthesized from Earth jurisprudence and compassionate conservation. 2 THE PROBLEM OF INVASIVE SPECIES AND THEIR REGULATION The CBD uses the phrase ‘invasive alien species’ to describe species that have been ‘introduced outside [their] … natural past or present distribution’ and which ‘threaten biological diversity

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R. Quentin Grafton, Harry W. Nelson, N. Ross Lambie and Paul R. Wyrwoll

Also known as the World Conservation Union. It was formed in 1948 by governments and non-governmental organizations and today has over 139 countries represented in its membership. Its mandate is to conserve the integrity and diversity of nature in an equitable and ecologically sustainable way.

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Clem Tisdell and Clevo Wilson

1. An overview of nature-based tourism and conservation 1.1 INTRODUCTION Tourism is globally a major industry, and by some measures it is estimated to be the world’s largest industry. Furthermore, it is a growing industry. The demand for tourism tends to rise with per capita income and with increasing education as well as with rising levels of population, other things remaining constant. Globally, the level of the world’s population continues to grow, the number of people receiving more years of education is going up, and so too is the number of those who are

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Bob Crabtree

7. Agricultural policy and nature conservation in the UK Bob Crabtree INTRODUCTION Habitat protection in Britain took a major step forward in the 1980s with two major pieces of legislation. The first, the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act, strengthened instruments for the protection of Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) from potentially damaging operations, especially on farmland. The act was not designed to provide for the more general protection of valued countryside from changes in land use. Since agriculture was outside the planning system, farmers

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Nature-based Tourism and Conservation

New Economic Insights and Case Studies

Clem Tisdell and Clevo Wilson

Nature-based Tourism and Conservation unearths new or neglected principles relevant to tourism and recreational economics, environmental valuation and economic theory. Its three parts have chapters on nature-based tourism and its relationships to conservation including case studies dealing with the consequences of World Heritage listing of natural sites, Antarctic, subtropical and tropical national park-based tourism and an NGO’s conservation efforts modelled on ecotourism. The final part focuses on tourism utilizing particular wildlife, including sea turtles, whales, penguins, royal albatross, glow-worms and tree kangaroos.
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Clement A. Tisdell

following topics are discussed: ●  conflicts, valuation issues and the costs of policies for conserving koalas; ●  the role of wildlife rehabilitation centres in nature conservation; ●  ecotourism enterprises and the conservation of species; and ●  conflicts between conservationists about conserving species as illustrated by the presence of wild horses (brumbies) in the high country of Australia. 7.2  BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT COVER A DIVERSE RANGE OF TOPICS AND ISSUES Today, most studies of biological conservation and management concentrate on

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Nicolas de Sadeleer

of Europe and the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) have been adopting several international environmental agreements (MEAs) focusing on nature conservation. 1 However, the existence of these MEAs should not lull us into thinking that all areas of biodiversity are now well protected. Conservation objectives vary from one agreement to the next, such that no harmonization, even on a geographical level, is assured. Although particular areas of biodiversity are covered well on a continental scale (including migratory or the most endangered vertebrate species

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Robert Fletcher, Wolfram Dressler and Bram Büscher

JOBNAME: Bryant PAGE: 1 SESS: 4 OUTPUT: Tue Jul 28 13:37:25 2015 26. NatureTM Inc.: nature as neoliberal capitalist imaginary Robert Fletcher, Wolfram Dressler and Bram Büscher The global conservation movement is currently ‘reinventing’ itself to a degree that is not yet clearly understood. What is clear, however, is that this reinvention is aligned with broader dynamics in neoliberal capitalism (Igoe et al., 2010). This convergence is represented by mechanisms such as ecotourism, payments for ecosystem services and biodiversity derivatives, and enabled through