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Ruth Bridgstock and Neil Tippett

6. Connectedness pedagogies Ruth Bridgstock and Neil Tippett INTRODUCTION The first section of this volume explored what connectedness capabilities are, characterising the connectedness of higher education students and graduates in different fields, and demonstrating some of the career and broader life outcomes that can result from an individual’s ability to forge and then make the most of their social networks. This section starts to consider the role that higher education can play in fostering these capabilities, examining the learning experiences and

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Edited by Jorge A. Arevalo and Shelley F. Mitchell

Pedagogical features Chapter 1 Elements of a holistic approach to SiME Chapter 6 Basic concepts of anthropology applied to sustainability in management education Basic bibliography for teachers and students Chapter 7 Course syllabus Mission Possible outcomes and results, charity donations, and financial outputs Chapter 8 Survey instrument Pedagogical approaches Chapter 9 Detailed course schedule The ten learning principles of action reflection learning Chapter 10 Ethics in Organizations syllabus Chapter 11 Syllabus of the initial application Chapter

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Henrietta Nilson

JOBNAME: Nordqvist PAGE: 1 SESS: 6 OUTPUT: Thu Jun 18 13:25:09 2015 12. Critical pedagogy theory and the family business Henrietta Nilson 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Dominating Theoretical Views in Family Business Research The family business can be viewed as a social construction surrounded by social limits as well as legal restrictions that tend to survive over time (Berger and Luckmann, 1991). These restrictions cause limited situations (Freire, 1970) for the family, which hinder them from living their lives fully and running their companies as would otherwise be

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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori

The third volume of the Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy critically examines past practices, current thinking, and future insights into the ever-expanding world of Entrepreneurship education. Prepared under the auspices of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), this compendium covers a broad range of scholarly, practical, and thoughtful perspectives on a compelling range of entrepreneurship education issues.
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Edited by Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

The second edition of Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy provides entirely new insights into a number of the leading issues surrounding the teaching of entrepreneurship and the building of entrepreneurship programs. Prepared under the auspices of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), this book features fifteen scholarly perspectives on a range of entrepreneurship education issues.
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Jeff Reid and Eric Koester

21.  The Creator Pedagogy: learning about entrepreneurship through authorship Jeff Reid and Eric Koester1 KEY QUESTIONS TO SET THE STAGE ●● ●● ●● Most undergraduate students lack deep expertise, credibility, and professional networks, all of which can be important to entrepreneurial success. How can we help them gain these assets before they even graduate? What happens when you encounter a student who doesn’t want to start a business venture . . . yet? How can we help more students discern what they are truly passionate about, and then use entrepreneurship as a

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Mark P. Rice and William C. Stitt

3. A portfolio of integrative and reinforcing pedagogies Mark P. Rice and William C. Stitt INTRODUCTION In many disciplines and in many educational systems around the world, education is delivered via instructor-centered learning. In its simplest form, the instructor transfers knowledge via lectures and assigned readings; explains and/or demonstrates a method for applying the knowledge; assigns students exercises that engage them in practicing the application of the methodology; and then tests whether the students have absorbed the knowledge and mastered the

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Sarah Dyer

10.  Co-pedagogy: teaching together for successful student learning Sarah Dyer Two features common to introductory units (modules/courses) are their size and the number of people involved in teaching them. Whilst other chapters in this part of the volume address the challenge of teaching and assessing large cohorts (see, in this volume, Chapter 4 by Finn and Mott; Chapter 5 by Rink; Chapter 7 by Ramdas), this chapter considers the difficulties and opportunities afforded by teaching with others. As this isn’t something geographers have given much attention to in

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Pauline E. Kneale

33.  Exploring pedagogic tensions in final year programme design Pauline E. Kneale INTRODUCTION What is the purpose of the final undergraduate year, making it distinctive pedagogically and as a capstone experience that provides professional experiences with lasting benefits? Questions that arise in considering the curriculum include: whose space is it; what are the most effective learning and assessment styles; what experiences will yield the greatest long-term relevance; how do we move towards long-term capabilities (Walkington et al., 2018), and who makes the

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Ian C. Fuller and Derek France

22.  Field-based pedagogies for developing learners’ independence Ian C. Fuller and Derek France INTRODUCTION: THE PLACE OF FIELDWORK IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM Fieldwork in the undergraduate geography curriculum has been described as being defining, distinctive, valuable, central, important, fundamental, intrinsic, integral and essential to the discipline (for example Haigh and Gold, 1993; Kent et al., 1997; Driver, 2000; Pawson and Teather, 2002; Stoddart and Adams, 2004; Fuller et al., 2006; Boyle et al., 2007; Maskall and Stokes, 2008; Hope, 2009