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Mark Busse

7 Property Mark Busse In colloquial English, ‘property’ refers to things that belong to a person or group. One thinks of things like land, houses, cars and paintings, and more recently, perhaps, of songs, software or artistic designs. Things, and the relationship between things and the people who own them, comprise the two parts of dictionary definitions of property as owning, being owned and things that are owned. While such usage emphasises property as objects or things, anthropologists and legal scholars generally understand property in terms of social

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Chris Hann

CHAPTER 07 21/2/05 8:54 AM Page 4 7 Property Chris Hann One key element in the anthropologist’s approach to property (as to other key concepts) is to ‘relativise’, to question whether the understanding that has emerged in our intellectual traditions can provide an adequate base for understanding others. The English term ‘property’ is closely tied to the history of enclosures and the emergence of capitalism. It may be misleading to conceive the complex, non-exclusive patterns of access and use characteristic of precapitalist land tenure in terms of property

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Thomas J. Miceli

~ ~~ ~ 9 Property Thomas J. Miceli Introduction The concept of property is fundamental to both law and economics. The law defines and protects the bundle of rights that constitute property, thereby creating the legal framework within which resource allocation and wealth distribution take place. The economic approach to property law emphasizes its role in promoting an efficient allocation of resources. Accomplishing this goal generally involves creation and protection of individual rights in property so as to encourage exchange and investment, though, in some

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Thomas J. Miceli

15 Property Thomas J. Miceli Introduction The concept of property is fundamental to both law and economics. The law defines and protects the bundle of rights that constitute property, thereby creating the legal framework within which resource allocation and wealth distribution take place. The economic approach to property law emphasizes its role in promoting an efficient allocation of resources. Accomplishing this goal generally involves creation and protection of individual rights in property so as to encourage exchange and investment, though, in some cases

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Simon James

Property such as land and buildings in contrast to movable property such as chattels .

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Peter Groves

A term employed in civil law jurisdictions, equivalent to intangible property and therefore including many intellectual property rights.

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Simon James

A tax based on the value of property, though it is often limited to certain types of property such as land and buildings. In some countries it is an important source of local government finance . See also Proposition 13 . Further reading Anderson , N.B. ( 2006 ), ‘ Property tax limitations: an interpretive review ’, National

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George Norman and Darlene C. Chisholm

Ownership or exclusive rights to use an asset such as a good or service. Others must pay you if they wish to use the asset. An individual has property rights in their time, the car that they own or the house that they own. The individual does not have property rights in a public highway, even if the highway is paid for and maintained by tax revenues.

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Criminalising property

Property, Power and Market Economies

Mark Findlay

Law’s Regulatory Relevance? 2.    Criminalising property Whether something will be regarded as property is nothing more, and nothing less, than a conclusion of law. 87 Introduction Instructed by market mechanisms, the law currently ensures exclusive ownership, protects possession of property and controls pricing. In this way, property commodification through law displaces the societal value of property with a monetary value, allowing property to be dislocated, alienated and transacted as part of the market economy. In the process, law

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Anthony J. Culyer

In statistics, this usually refers to a property of a statistic that applies as the sample size approaches infinity. More generally it is a straight line that is the limiting value of a curve; a tangent to the curve at infinity. See Asymptote .