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Anthony J. Culyer

Public health is similar to population health , and draws on social epidemiology to embrace the widest range of determinants of health in a society; a broader range of technologies for addressing them than is encompassed in public health medicine , such as better parenting for childhood development, better housing, even greater equality of income and wealth; and the broader range of institutional pathways and vectors of influence implied by the forgoing, such as schooling and schools, working and workplace. To tackle health effectively in this fashion plainly

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Iris Goldner Lang

16.  Public health in European Union food law Iris Goldner Lang I. INTRODUCTION The production of food significantly impacts human health. This chapter addresses the most challenging public health concerns related to food and examines the ways in which the protection of public health has impacted the development of EU food policy.1 The discussion points to the existing legal and policy challenges and gaps in the food law regime related to public health, and suggests possible modification that would address these challenges. It calls for a further shift of

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Alberto Alemanno

EU public health law and policy – tobacco 14.  EU public health law and policy – tobacco Alberto Alemanno* I. INTRODUCTION Despite its increasing public rejection and reduced social acceptance, smoking remains the single largest cause of preventable death and disease in the European Union, accounting for 650,000 deaths each year – r­ epresenting more than 15 per cent of all deaths in the EU.1 In addition, more than 13 million people in the 28 countries of the EU suffer from smoking-­related diseases.2 However, for more than a decade smoking prevalence has been

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James A. Smith, Noel Richardson and Steve Robertson

7.  Applying a genders lens to public health discourses on men’s health James A. Smith, Noel Richardson and Steve Robertson INTRODUCTION The state of men’s health is something that continues to generate cause for concern across many areas of the globe. The main concern relates to men’s poorer rates of longevity ­compared to those of women. In the developed world (or ‘Global North’) this difference has been reported in Australia (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011; ANPHA, 2013), North America (White, 2008; Oliffe et al., 2010), and across Europe

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Katharina Ó Cathaoir, Mette Hartlev and Céline Brassart Olsen

JOBNAME: Burci PAGE: 1 SESS: 4 OUTPUT: Thu Oct 4 09:06:38 2018 14. Global health law and obesity: towards a complementary approach of public health and human rights law Katharina Ó Cathaoir, Mette Hartlev and Céline Brassart Olsen 1. INTRODUCTION Global norms have played a limited role in obesity prevention to date. At the same time, policy makers and academics increasingly endorse a multisectoral approach to preventing obesity, with law suggested as one of several measures.1 The ubiquity of high obesity rates in developed and developing states necessitates

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Anthony J. Culyer

The practice of disease prevention and health promotion through the use of collective agencies and actions (for example, population vaccination, safety at work, health education, water purification). Virtually the same as social medicine . For some economics of public health see Bishai and Adam ( 2006 ).

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Lawrence O Gostin

Law can be a vital tool to prevent and ameliorate injury and disease in the population— whether at the local, national, regional, or global level. I have defined public health law as: The legal powers and duties of the state to assure the conditions for people to be healthy (to identify, prevent, and ameliorate risks to health in the population) and the limitations on the power of the state to constrain the autonomy, privacy, liberty, proprietary, or other legally protected interests of individuals for the common good. The prime objective of public health

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Ronald Hamowy

1. The Public Health Service The Public Health Service is the successor agency of the United States Marine Hospital Service, which was established in 17981 by act of Congress for the purpose of caring for sick and injured merchant seamen.2 Seamen were required to contribute 20 cents per month to cover the costs of this medical care.3 In 1800 the first marine hospital was opened at Washington Point, near Norfolk, Virginia, and by 1802 hospitals were also established at Boston, Newport, and Charleston. As the nation expanded, the number of marine hospitals

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Duncan Matthews

3. Counterfeiting and public health Duncan Matthews 1. INTRODUCTION In the debate about counterfeiting and public health there is a tendency to conflate three distinct issues: first, counterfeit goods that infringe trademarks; second, medicines suspected of infringing patents; and, third, falsified medicines which contain the wrong or insufficient active ingredients.1 2. COUNTERFEITING Counterfeiting is a term with a very specific meaning in intellectual property law. It describes the theft of brand owners’ intellectual property, namely a trademark violation.2

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Roger D. Masters

22.  Toxins, health, and behavior: implications of toxicology for public policy Roger D. Masters 1.  INTRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF LEAD AND MANGANESE ON HUMANS Within universities, studies of the impact of toxins on behavior or health are endangered by the divisions between departments in the Natural and Social Sciences. Toxicologists focus on the danger of chemicals, often in laboratory testing; political scientists study factors shaping the way public issues are perceived and the effects of political decisions. In the new field of Biology and Politics, these issues