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Angela M. Eikenberry

12. Social entrepreneurship and democracy Angela M. Eikenberry INTRODUCTION The market pervades more and more facets of our lives (Sandel, 2012). Lifestyles are created around brands and logos (Klein, 2002), the poor are considered a market niche (Prahalad, 2006) and consumerism is recognized as a key form of political and civic action (Beck, 2005; King, 2006), in an environment where public spaces have either disappeared or been ‘made safe for shopping’ (Ferrell, 2001). Even the philanthropic impulse is increasingly marketized (Hawkins, 2012; King, 2006; Nickel

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David Beetham

5.  Democracy and social justice David Beetham The claim of democracy is that it provides both a standard of social justice in the political sphere and a means to remedy injustices in economy and society. That is to say, it bears both an intrinsic and an extrinsic relationship to social justice. As to the intrinsic relationship, the two basic principles of democracy – popular control over collective decisionmaking and decision-makers, and equality in the exercise of that control – serve as a clear standard for social justice in the political domain (Beetham 1999

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Denise M. Horn

13. Social entrepreneurship, democracy and political participation Denise M. Horn SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND DEMOCRACY Social entrepreneurship, in the simplest of terms, is the practice of applying business solutions to social problems. Social entrepreneurship represents the logical outcome of neoliberalism’s emphasis upon privatization, particularly in the provision of social goods. In the age of the Washington Consensus and IMF structural adjustment programs, governments shed their responsibility for fulfilling social needs, such as education, poverty

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Greg Patmore

6.  Different types of societal regulation – coordinated market economy, social democracy, aspiration of worker control Greg Patmore INTRODUCTION With the emphasis in recent years on liberal market economies (LME), approaches that emphasise more collective approaches to economic and social issues have been under major attack. Social democratic parties, for instance, have exercised state power in a cultural context in which neo-liberal axioms largely prevail over social democratic ones. Since 1989–1990, they have exercised power too in a post-Cold War universe in

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Nik Brandal and Øivind Bratberg

7. Small-­state Scandinavia: social investment or social democracy? Nik Brandal and Øivind Bratberg INTRODUCTION The concept of a social investment state is often presented as a way of reconciling economic productivity with social equality. From this perspective, social investment implies that welfare policies (and regulation of the economy more generally) may be designed so as to encourage high-­skilled labour and social mobility and thereby a reasonable extent of ­redistribution. Thus, the state invests in its citizens, who respond with enhanced productivity

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Susan S. Fainstein

10  Social justice and urban policy deliberation: balancing the discourses of democracy, diversity and equity Susan S. Fainstein Critical urban analysis is a recent form of scholarly inquiry, having developed in the West during the urban uprisings of the 1960s and 1970s, although it has antecedents at the turn of the twentieth century.1 In the first part of that century the study of urban phenomena was within the disciplines of public administration, urban planning, and sociology. These largely assumed the existence of a unified public interest, technical

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Angela M. Eikenberry

4 Social enterprises and democracy in countries with transitional or authoritarian regimes Angela M. Eikenberry Introduction It has been 15 years since scholars first raised concerns about the impact of social enterprise and entrepreneurship on democracy (Dart 2004b; Eikenberry and Kluver 2004). Since then, this critique has become partially mainstreamed (Ebrahim et al. 2014; Nicholls and Teasdale 2017), but questions remain, particularly around democratization in the context of transitional and authoritarian regimes. Scholars studying in these countries find

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The Diversity of Democracy

Corporatism, Social Order and Political Conflict

Edited by Colin Crouch and Wolfgang Streeck

Revisiting the now classical literature on neo-corporatism in light of current research and theory, the contributors illustrate the enormous influence of the ‘neo-corporatist debate’ on modern political science, political sociology, and political economy. Reflecting on a major part of the recent history of social science, they shed light on some of its current core concepts, such as governance, policy networks, and varieties of capitalism. The book traces the evolution of political conflicts concerning social order; from the class conflicts in Europe in the of 1970s Europe to the subsequent Latin American and Eastern European battles over democratization and democratic transition, to the debate on the ‘democratic deficit’ of the European Union.
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Milena Büchs

3. Directly-deliberative polyarchy: a suitable democracy model for European social policy? Milena Büchs INTRODUCTION Directly-deliberative polyarchy is a new model of decentralized democracy and social policy recently applied to legitimize the Open Method of Coordination (Gerstenberg and Sabel 2002; Eberlein and Kerwer 2004). To be able to discuss the appropriateness of directly-deliberative polyarchy for legitimizing the Open Method of Coordination, it is crucial to reflect on the relationship between democracy and social policy more generally. The

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Henriette Sinding Aasen, Siri Gloppen, Anne-Mette Magnussen and Even Nilssen

JOBNAME: Aasen PAGE: 1 SESS: 3 OUTPUT: Mon Jul 21 10:46:54 2014 15. Juridification and social citizenship: international law, democracy and professional discretion Henriette Sinding Aasen, Siri Gloppen, Anne-Mette Magnussen and Even Nilssen Throughout this book, our main concern has been to explore how social citizenship is legally constructed in different fields of the welfare state, and the legal and social implications of these constructions. Social citizenship is understood as the state’s regulation of opportunities for citizens to exercise their autonomy