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  • Series: Research Handbooks in International Law series x
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Edited by James A.R. Nafziger and Stephen F. Ross

This Handbook presents a comprehensive collection of essays by leading scholars and practitioners in the burgeoning field of international sports law.
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Edited by Malgosia Fitzmaurice, David M. Ong and Panos Merkouris

This wide-ranging and comprehensive Handbook examines recent developments in international environmental law (IEL) and the crossover effects of this expansion on other areas of international law, such as trade law and the law of the sea.
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Edited by Geraint Howells, Iain Ramsay, Thomas Wihelmsson and David Kraft

Consumer law and policy has emerged in the last half-century as a major policy concern for all nations. This Handbook of original contributions provides an international and comparative analysis of central issues in consumer law and policy in developed and developing economies.
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Edited by Jan Klabbers and Åsa Wallendahl

This pioneering Research Handbook with contributions from renowned experts, provides an overview of the general doctrines making up the law of international organizations.
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Edited by Alexander Orakhelashvili

This pioneering Research Handbook, with contributions from renowned experts, provides a comprehensive scholarly framework for analyzing the theory and history of international law. Given the multiplication of theoretical approaches over the last three decades, and attendant fragmentation of scholarly efforts, this edited collection presents a useful doctrinal platform that will help academics and students to see the theory and history of international law in its entirety, and to understand how interdependent various aspects of the theory and history of international law really are.
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Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

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Edited by Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

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Edited by Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

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Edited by Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

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Virginie Barral

Environmental interdependencies place undeniable pressures and challenges on the cardinal principle of state sovereignty and in particular on the principle of national sovereignty over natural resources. This chapter explores whether and how developments in the environmental field have constrained the traditional understanding of sovereignty and possibly changed its meaning. It does so firstly by analysing how the reorganisation of emerging rules and principles around the matrix of sustainable development may allow to move away from a purely conflictual relationship between national sovereignty and resource preservation towards one based on mutual interest. The chapter next reviews the impact of new and redefined legal categories such as common property, common heritage, common concern, or shared resources. It then offers a partial mapping of the widening environmental constraints on national sovereignty flowing from classic duties to protect the rights of others, the existence of an international interest in resource protection, and more innovative and challenging constraints even absent any immediate international interest in resource conservation. Ultimately, the analysis suggests that conceptually, locating national sovereignty and resource protection within the framework of sustainable development and its clear anthropocentric focus permits tensions to be defused and allows for the reconciliation of these two delicately balanced principles.