Reforming Transport Pricing in the European Union
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Reforming Transport Pricing in the European Union A Modelling Approach

A Modelling Approach

  • Transport Economics, Management and Policy series

Edited by Bruno De Borger and Stef Proost

This timely book deals with the problem of pricing passenger and freight transportation within Europe. The contributors argue that current legislation affecting pricing and regulation is increasingly less successful in dealing with market failures and externalities such as congestion, air pollution, noise and accidents. Technological progress and greater European co-operation has brought increased scope for the reform of transport policies.
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Chapter 8: External accident costs and the relationship between road accidents and traffic flows

Andrew Dickerson, John Peirson and Roger Vickerman

Extract

8. External accident costs and the relationship between road accidents and traffic flows Andrew Dickerson, John Peirson and Roger Vickerman* 8.1 INTRODUCTION The previous chapter considers the estimation of the marginal external costs of different modes of transport. This short chapter examines one unresolved aspect of the estimation of the external costs of road accidents. The attention devoted to just one aspect of the estimation of the external costs of transport may be justified by the suggested substantial size of road accident external costs1 and, as will be shown shortly, there being a major problem with previous attempts to estimate these costs. The process of preparing estimates of the external costs of road accidents is usually divided up into three parts (see, for example, Maddison et al. 1996; Mayeres, Ochelen and Proost, 1996, and Peirson, Skinner and Vickerman, 1998). First, the relationship between road accidents and traffic flows is examined. Second, those parts of accident costs that are external are considered. Finally, values are placed on these externalities. This chapter only examines the first stage in the estimation of road accident externalities, that of identifying the functional relationship between accidents and vehicular flows. The accident–flow relationship is investigated by matching the UK’s Department of Transport’s London traffic flow data for the mid-1990s with * We would like to thank, without implication, the Department of Transport for giving us access to the automatic count data used in this study. Particular thanks are due to Daniel Aromire...

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