Knowledge Flows in National Systems of Innovation
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Knowledge Flows in National Systems of Innovation

A Comparative Analysis of Sociotechnical Constituencies in Europe and Latin America

  • New Horizons in the Economics of Innovation series

Edited by Roberto López-Martínez and Andrea Piccaluga

The search for the key to economic growth has proved elusive and contentious. This book uses new empirical evidence to propose an integrated approach for achieving strong industrial and technological capabilities to form the basis for regional and national economic development.
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Chapter 7: The role of the biotechnology and pharmaceutical scientific and productive clusters in the Cuban innovative activity

Leonardo de la Rosa and Blanca Esther Martín

Extract

7. The role of the biotechnology and pharmaceutical scientific and productive clusters in the Cuban innovative activity Leonardo de la Rosa and Blanca Esther Martín 7.1 INTRODUCTION Nowadays, enterprises from developing and developed countries include marketing principles as part of the effective application of technological innovation in order to be more competitive and to become firmly established in the marketplace. In Cuba, this element of competition is replaced by the national goal to maximize its scientific and technological resources in order to maximize the production of goods and services (Figueras 1994). Thus, Cuba’s socioeconomic infrastructure requires a new approach which will (i) prioritize technological development at every level; (ii) integrate resources throughout the system; (iii) lead to the development of more efficient and effective technologies nationwide; and (iv) allow for a better assimilation of domestic and foreign technologies. While the Cuban government has fostered technological innovation to the extent that there is already a synergetic influence on the country’s socioeconomic development, such development has been tightly controlled. What is needed now is the involvement of independent agents. The resulting plan for accomplishing this has been called the Cuban Technology Innovation System. One important element in stopping the economic crisis since 1994 has been the innovative capacity which little by little has been created in the field of manufacturing and services, and that created in the interfaces between industry and commerce. A clear example of all this is given by scientific and productive clusters. One...

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